June 23, 2017

Shows & Events

AR, VR Lead Top Tech Trends Discussion | ALA Midwinter 2017

The LITA Top Tech Trends panel at ALA Midwinter covered augmented reality, virtual reality, trends in teaching and technology, gamification, community driven technology innovation, and more.

LJ Reviewer Makes His ALA Debut | ALA Midwinter 2017

Library Journal’s 2016 Video Reviewer of the Year Douglas Rednour made his first appearance at an American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting this January. He has reviewed dozens of horror films for us since mid-2015. How scary could this conference have been?

LJ’s Reviews of RUSA’s Top Genre Fiction | ALA Midwinter 2017

On January 22, RUSA’s Reading List Council announced the 2017 selections of the annual best-of Reading List, comprised of eight different fiction genres for adult readers. Check out below LJ’s full reviews of the winners and look for the complete reviews of the short list titles in BookVerdict.

Improving Federal and State Policy & Family Engagement in Libraries | ALA Midwinter 2017

Update as of February 2017: Since this post was published, the Department of Education has removed the website for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). LJ is keeping  the original post as is, in case IDEA is reinstated. A rainy day didn’t prevent attendees from joining a session on Improving Federal and State Policy […]

Racial Justice at Your Library hosted by Libraries4BlackLives | ALA Midwinter 2017

After the July 2016 shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile by police in Louisiana and Minnesota, respectively, the #librariesrespond hashtag was a safe place for librarians on twitter to share everything from programs to resources to self-care tips. During this time, Amita Lonial, Learning Experiences Manager at Skokie Public Library (IL), wondered if libraries […]

Placemaking and the Public Library | ALA Midwinter 2017

“People crave community. Community needs space. Space can create community. If you are not creating community, you are probably not creating places,” explained Michelle Jeske, City Librarian at Denver Public Library (DPL) and a 2005 LJ Mover & Shaker, to an eager crowd gathered for Placemaking and the Public Library on Sunday, January 22. What […]

Not Business as Usual | ALA Midwinter 2017

In spite of intermittent rain, the mild temperatures of Atlanta, GA, made it a welcome destination for the 2017 American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting, held January 20–24. Current events—notably the inauguration on Friday of Donald Trump as the 45th president—drove a series of offerings that were definitely not business as usual.

ITHAKA’s Next Wave: How Macro Changes in Higher Ed Shape Strategy

For its 2016 Next Wave conference, scholarly nonprofit organization ITHAKA brought together nearly 200 academic librarians, publishers, technology partners, and scholars at New York’s Roosevelt Hotel on November 30 to take a look at what may lie ahead for academia. “The Bigger Picture: How Macro Changes in Higher Education Should Shape Your Strategy” condensed what had previously been spread over two days into one all-day session, with a strong focus on academic professionals’ take on the landscape.

ALA in ATL | ALA Midwinter Preview 2017

From the opening session with political comedian W. Kamau Bell through the closing keynote by actor Neil Patrick Harris, the American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting sets an ambitious agenda, tackling timely political issues such as how to work with the new presidential administration and Congress; ongoing social concerns like equity and inclusion; and how best to drive the continuing technological transformation of libraries on the one hand and accurately assess our successes—and learn from our failures—on the other.

Big Data and Small Steps at the Charleston Conference 2016

At this year’s Charleston Conference, held as always in lovely Charleston, SC, in early November, attendees seemed in a mood to focus on practical, incremental progress, with sessions on assessment packed with standing room only audiences while questions of where the field is going failed to pull the crowds.