December 19, 2014

Reservation Management | Product Spotlight

ljx141002webenisCompriseSAM

Print management and computer reservation solutions are designed to help libraries cut down on waste and ensure that time on public computers is distributed fairly among patrons, with minimal staff intervention. To keep pace with current trends, several vendors have added new features to their public computer management packages in recent months, enabling patrons to print from their own mobile devices, for example. All vendors negotiate pricing on a system- by-system basis, typically according to the selection of specific options or modules, the number of branches in which the solutions will be used, and the number of public access stations at each branch. Some solutions, such as Librarica’s CASSIE and Comprise’s SAM, are designed as fully integrated systems offering a variety of management features in one package. Other providers, such as EnvisionWare, iTeam, and GoPrint, offer the option to purchase reservation and print management modules separately. However, all vendors contacted for this spotlight describe their solutions as scalable, with options available for networks with as few as five public computers.

ITHAKA Sustainable Scholarship 2014 Brings Data and Process Together

I_ISS2014_square

On October 20–21, scholarly nonprofit organization ITHAKA held its annual Sustainable Scholarship conference at New York City’s Wyndham Hotel. The event’s theme, “At the Starting Line,” echoed the concerns of many libraries, publishers, and institutions about the demands for change driven by today’s information marketplace.

How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

Rick Anderson

My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of the recent revelations about privacy incursions in the latest version of Adobe Digital Editions.

OverDrive API Usage Indicates Growth of Ebook Checkouts via OPAC

OverDrive API Usage Indicates Growth of Ebook Checkouts via OPAC

OverDrive is currently processing 350 million API server calls per month, and has supported 1.3 million checkouts via APIs to date in 2014, according to internal data given to LJ. API use has also risen steadily each quarter, with almost 233,000 checkouts during the first three months of the year, more than 529,000 in Q2, an estimated 692,000 in Q3, and a projection of at least 1 million during the final three months of the year.

Lynda.com to Offer At-Home Access for Library Users

Lynda.com logo

Lynda.com this month has soft launched lyndaLibrary, a subscription model for libraries that offers patrons unlimited offsite access to the company’s complete collection of online training resources.

Westport Maker Space Expands with Robots, SolidWorks Courses, and Volunteer Training

Westport Library Robot

The Westport Library’s ongoing efforts to support its Maker Space, including Maker in Residence programs and the recent acquisition of two programmable robots, have helped establish a virtuous cycle in which residents have begun working on their own projects and helping one another independently.

Endow a National Digital Library | Backtalk

Only about 12 percent of an average U.S. library budget is for books and other content. Antilibrary zealots will latch onto this statistic eventually, downplaying that libraries are about much more than books. A good proactive response would be a national digital library endowment and separate but allied digital library systems—one for public library patrons, the other mainly for academia, even though everyone could access both. New digital efficiencies could help libraries offer taxpayers even more value than they do now.

Queens Library Develops Innovative New Tablet Platform Using Superstorm Sandy Donation | TDS14

Queens Library Develops Innovative New Tablet Platform Using Superstorm Sandy Donation | TDS14

When superstorm Sandy hit the east coast in October 2012, the Queens Library (QL) in New York was among many northeastern library systems affected. QL persevered, continuing to offer crucial services in storm-ravaged communities while rebuilding damaged branches. The system also managed to turn a generous corporate donation into an innovative new platform for tablet computers, enabling a tech lending program that has since continued to grow.

Librarians React to Pew Study on Willingness to Disagree on Social Media

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As libraries continue exploring ways to weave online social media into their core service, a Pew study suggests popular Internet gathering spots such as Facebook and Twitter are not effective places for generating meaningful or honest conversation about significant news events. Not only are people not more willing to discuss controversial issues online than they are in person, in fact, the reverse is true.

The Mess of Ebooks | Peer to Peer Review

Wayne Biven-Tatum

I’ve run into a few problems with library ebooks lately that have made me even more skeptical of them as complete replacements for print books in libraries. Since skeptics of library ebooks are sometimes considered luddites or reactionaries, I should go ahead and add the disclaimer that I really like ebooks that I don’t acquire from the library. I did a quick calculation of the books I’ve read since mid-January and of those 33 books, 27 were ebooks. Some of them were several hundred pages long, but reading them on a good ereader was generally a pleasant experience.