September 23, 2016

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The Future of Play | Designing the Future

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To Rivkah Sass, executive director, Sacramento Public Library (SPL), CA, there is no greater enemy to young children than the “play gap”—the shrinking time to explore, invent, and run amok. Hence the Sacramento Play Summit (SPS), a one-day program for parents, teachers, caregivers, and librarians to discuss play, why it’s important, and how to bring more of it to children.

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The Future of Futures | Designing the Future

Illustration ©2016 Daniel Hertzberg

Human-centered design, a highly creative approach to problem solving, is gaining popularity in libraries as they plan for what lies ahead. Also known as design thinking, it focuses on defining and then resolving concerns by paying attention to the needs, aspirations, and wishes of people—in the case of libraries, not only a library’s patrons but its staff, administration, and members of the community who may not be library customers…yet.

What’s After Pokémon Go? Explore Augmented Reality Sept 13 | SLJ ISTE Webcast Series

This fall series, sponsored by littleBits, explores the education technology topics educators are talking about this school year, from virtual reality and STEAM to popular culture and digital literacy.

What’s After Pokémon Go? Explore Augmented Reality Sept 13 | SLJ ISTE Webcast Series

This fall series, sponsored by littleBits, explores the education technology topics educators are talking about this school year, from virtual reality and STEAM to popular culture and digital literacy.

Birmingham Public Library Board Funds Innovative Cool Awards

Birmingham Public Library Board presents the first Innovative Cool Award to help fund the Career Survival Program at Pratt City Branch Library. L-R: Library Trustee Eunice Johnson Rogers, Library Trustee Gwen Amamoo, Pratt City Library Branch Manager Deborah Drake Blackmon, and Byron Williams of Pratt City Library.

While many libraries have come up with creative rewards for staff innovation, the Birmingham Public Library (BPL) Innovative Cool Awards do double duty. The monthly award, funded and run by BPL’s ten-member Board of Trustees, is an incentive for staff to develop—and promote—engaging new programs and workshops, and also a way to connect the board with staff.

Pokémon GO: What Do Librarians Need To Know?

Where’s Pikachu? How libraries are connecting with patrons over this wildly popular new virtual treasure hunt that uses geolocation—and why the game raises privacy concerns.

Queens Library Steps Forward with Google ‘Computer Science First’ Kid Club

Former New York City Mayor David Dinkins was on hand to cheer the city’s first public library-based sites, 26 branches in Queens, a county of 2.3 million that’s one of the most ethnically diverse in the country.

Word of Mouth | Language Learning

ENGAGING ENGLISH (Clockwise from top l.): New Americans Corner in Nashville Public Library’s (NPL) Southeast Branch;  Nashville patron shows off her new library card; ready to write at NPL; NPL adult literacy coordinator Megan Godbey (l.) offers computer help; Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh’s Let’s Speak English group

Programming that supports English-language learning (ELL) is not new in the world of public libraries. Kenneth English, associate director of adult learning centers at the New York Public Library (NYPL), has seen “photos and notices from around 1920 promoting classes in Manhattan’s Lower East Side immigrant neighborhoods.” While ELL programming has existed for nearly 100 years, modern libraries continue to update their offerings to fit the needs of their communities. Innovative and traditional projects that are responsive to demographic shifts and capitalize on local people power are key to best serving library customers working on their English-language skills.

ALA, Google Launch “Libraries Ready to Code”

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On April 13, the American Library Association (ALA) and Google announced the “Libraries Ready to Code” project, which will investigate the current status of computer programming activities in U.S. public and K–12 libraries with the goal of ultimately broadening the reach and scope of these coding programs. The project will include an environmental scan, practitioner interviews, focus groups, and site visits, and particular attention will be focused on opportunities that libraries are providing to minorities, girls, and other groups that are currently underrepresented in computer science and related fields, according to an announcement. The results of the project will be used to further engagement by ALA, and to inform a computer science policy agenda as part of the ALA Office for Information Technology Policy’s (OITP) Youth and Technology program.

Roger Rosen Appointed Senior Advisor for National Policy Advocacy

The leader of Rosen Publishing assumes key role in advancing the thinking and learning of youth in our digital society.