July 3, 2015

Exhibitor News Roundup | ALA Annual 2015

Every American Library Association (ALA) conference produces a bumper crop of news from the companies that serve libraryland, as each tends to time its biggest debuts to the event, and this year was no exception. Here’s an assortment of what we learned on the exhibit floor. Did we miss your news? Please add it in the comments!

Does the Copyright Office Belong in a Library? | Peer to Peer Review

Kevin L. Smith

It has been a busy time for those of us who watch the doings of the Copyright Office. In addition to releasing a massive report on Orphan Works and Mass Digitization, about which I have written here, the Copyright Office (CO) is the subject of a piece of legislation introduced as a discussion draft on June 3. The bill, if it were officially introduced and ultimately enacted, would remove the CO from the Library of Congress (LC) and establish it as an independent agency of the federal government, under the Executive Branch. Then, while we were still considering the ramifications of this idea, came the announcement on June 10 of the pending retirement of Dr. James Billington, who has been the Librarian of Congress for the past 29 years.

Movers Movies | ALA Annual 2015

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The 2015 cohort of LJ’s Movers & Shakers celebrated with some of their compatriots from previous year’s during the American Library Association (ALA) Annual conference at a gala luncheon at San Francisco’s The Blue Mermaid. For those who couldn’t attend, or who want to see more of the Movers they met there, below are a few videos made by some of this year’s most innovative librarians highlighting why they were selected. Pop some popcorn and enjoy!

Academic Libraries Look Toward the Future | ALA Annual 2015

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As proof positive that, even with their superior powers of observation and vision, librarians can’t predict the future, the planners for the American Library Association 2015 annual conference definitely underestimated how many people would be attending the program Look into the Crystal Ball: Future Directions for Higher Education and Academic Libraries, sponsored by the Association of College and Research Libraries University Libraries Section (ACRL ULS). Every seat was filled, as well as all available floor space, with attendees eager to hear the panel’s thoughts on what the future may hold for academic libraries.

National Promise: Anticipating a new era for LC | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

All eyes are on the Library of Congress (LC) as the iconic institution approaches what promises to be a transformational time. When long-standing Librarian of Congress James H. Billington announced his plan to retire in January 2016, bets started flying on who would be the best new leader. The job, to be filled by President Barack Obama’s appointment, with confirmation from Congress, is an exciting and challenging one.

A New Kind of Leader: Transition time at the Library of Congress | Blatant Berry

John Berry III

“I am not a librarian, but I am THE librarian!” Daniel Boorstin said to me several times when he was Librarian of Congress. It seemed to amuse him, and it only slightly annoyed me. There had been some controversy over President Gerald Ford, like so many before him, appointing a distinguished elder scholar to lead the Library of Congress (LC) rather than a credentialed, experienced librarian. Of the 13 Librarians of Congress, only two were really librarians.

UX Par Excellence | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl LaGuardia

I’m so happy I could be twins. We now have an honest-to-goodness Library User Experience (UX) Specialist: Amy Deschenes, who came to us from Simmons College, where she was the Systems and Web Applications Librarian. Amy has only been here for a couple of months, but the buzz has already gotten around about how much she can help us gain a user’s point of view; she did some work with undergraduate and graduate students right away upon getting to campus. I’d heard a lot of good things about her, and this summer our library is transitioning to LibGuides 2.0, which means it’s time for an overhaul of my LibGuides…so I wrote and asked if I could meet with her for pointers.

Color Me Curious | Office Hours

Michael Stephens

“It starts with us.” I use that phrase on a slide in my talks and course lectures and whenever I get the chance to talk about librarians, libraries, and our continual adaptation to societal and technological change. It’s also closely related to my thoughts on professional development and learning in the workplace. This isn’t sweeping organizational change; this time it’s personal.

Keep ’em Coming Back for S’mores | Programs That Pop

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Every teen librarian knows programs that offer snacks are usually a hit and can even entice teens reluctant to join in the fun. With that in mind, we offer many teen programs that include snacks, from Chocolate Fest to Pizza Gardening. When the Student Ambassadors proposed making a solar-powered s’mores oven for an Earth Day activity, we knew it would be a hit.

Smaller Press Books from the Show | ALA 2015

Wandering the booths at ALA revealed some intriguing books from publishers outside of the big five. Here’s a sample of what I saw.

Getting Graphic at ALA | ALA Annual 2015

Comic Book Club Handbook cover (illustration of a bird reading a comic book)

The American Library Association’s annual conference produced a crop of comics news, beginning with the Comic Book Club Handbook, a new resource produced by Comic Book Legal Defense Fund in collaboration with Comic-Con International, with the assistance of Erwin Magbanua of the San Diego Public Library and illustrated by cartoonist Rick Geary.

What’s in the Box | Field Reports

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As libraries work to maintain and increase their relevance, heightening awareness among nonusers is a ­necessity for survival and prosperity. To bring new users through its doors, Barr Memorial Library, an award-winning library serving the military community in Fort Knox, KY, leveraged the power of curiosity, posing the question, “What’s in the LibraryBox?”

The San Francisco Deets | ALA 2015

ALA 2015 logo

The opening general session of this year’s American Library Association (ALA) conference in San Francisco was a feel good fest, thanks largely to the good luck and good planning that ALA demonstrated in booking Roberta Kaplan, lawyer for the Supreme Court case that overturned the Defense of Marriage Act, as the opening keynote. On the two-year anniversary of that case, the Court found in favor of marriage equality, turning Kaplan’s speech into an emotional victory celebration punctuated with standing ovations.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, June 15, 2015 Issue

Sacred cows, the problem with free ebooks, is the MLIS too easy, and other letters to the editor from the June 15, 2015 issue of Library Journal

2015 Andrew Carnegie Winners | ALA Annual 2015

CLockwise from top left: fiction winner Anthony Doerr at the podium accepting his award; keynote speaker Karemm Abdul-Jabbar enlightened the audience, and nonfiction winner Bryan Stevenson celebrates his win. Photos by Tom Graves and James Rosso/TwiceHeroes.com

Each year, the American Library Association awards the Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction. Honoring the festivities at this year’s annual conference in San Francisco were outgoing ALA president Courtney Young, presenting the welcome address; author and basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, delivering the keynote; and Carnegie Medals Selection Committee Member Donna Seaman, announcing the winners. Below is the […]