November 16, 2017

Winners of the 2017 National Book Awards Announced

“Books matter because they give us information and hope and connect us to other people,” said Lisa Lucas, the National Book Foundation’s executive director, in a recorded message at the National Book Awards Ceremony and Benefit Dinner on November 15, at Cipriani’s in New York. Lucas appeared in person as well, appealing to the tightly packed audience for support (envelopes in the program facilitated donations) and proclaim the desire to “not just celebrate [both winners and finalists] tonight but…keep celebrating the work they do.”

SPONSORED CONTENT

Championing the Library’s Role in Sustainability

2017 LJ Mover & Shaker honoree Madeleine Charney discusses how libraries can support sustainability science with SAGE Publishing’s SVP of Global Learning Resources.

Renee F. Hill | LJ/ALISE Excellence in Teaching Award Winner 2017

The range of the 23 courses she leads (many of which she designed herself); her passion for teaching; her ability to create online asynchronous courses and make them come alive and feel personal to her students; and the extension of her role as an educator far beyond the MLIS classroom are only a few of the reasons Renee F. Hill has won the 2017 LJ/ALISE Excellence in Teaching Award, sponsored by Rowman & Littlefield.

The National Book Awards & Best of the Year Lists | Book Pulse

The National Book Awards are announced and The Washington Post picks the best books of the year.

Branching Out | Library Design

A compilation of recent building projects and plans for more as they were presented in the Library Hotline newsletter, from May 1 through August 7, 2017

News Briefs for September 1, 2017

Austin Public Library Friends Foundation, TX, receives $120,000 grant from Google.org; Washington State University’s Sustainable Heritage Network project wins the Society of American Archivists’ Council Exemplary Service Award; Watkinson Library at Trinity College gets a large comic book and graphic novel donation; and more News in Brief from the September 1, 2017 issue of Library Journal.

Audio in Stereo | Audio Spotlight

Audiobook listeners and podcast fans team up to drive the renaissance in spoken-word programming

Critics Divided on Future Home of the Living God | Book Pulse

Louise Erdrich’s latest is getting plenty of attention and the NBAs will be announced today in a ceremony starting at 7:20 p.m. EST

Tina Brown, Joe Biden, & Kevin Young Make Noise | Book Pulse

Tina Brown’s The Vanity Fair Diaries: 1983-1992, Joe Biden’s Promise Me, Dad: A Year of Hope, Hardship, and Purpose , and Kevin Young’s Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News draw critical attention. The NBAs are tomorrow.

Faculty and Archives Partner on MIT and Slavery Project

One of the newest courses on offer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is “MIT and Slavery,” collaboratively taught by Steven Craig Wilder, Barton L. Weller Professor of History, and Nora Murphy, archivist for reference, outreach, and instruction. The undergraduate class will focus on researching MIT’s historical ties to slavery and the slave trade, as well as the role the slave economy played in other American engineering and science institutions.

Run Your Week: Big Books, Sure Bets, & Titles Making News | Book Pulse

End Game by David Baldacci leads the holds count at the start of the week and the #1 LibraryReads November pick and the #1 Indie Next December selection hit shelves.

Beyond Desktops: 10 Ways to Make Your Automated Device Checkout Program One-of-A-Kind

Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017, 2PM-3PM ET / 11AM-12PM PT
Librarians only have so much time, and patrons bring an increasingly wide array of needs. In this informative webcast, learn how to customize a kiosk to deliver a one-of-a-kind experience to your patrons (and/or students). Find out how the self-service methodology can transform your facility, empower your end users and unburden your staff.
Register Now!

New to the Bestseller Lists | Book Pulse

The week ends with high and low points: the new bestsellers arrive and author Matthew Weiner is accused of sexual harassment.

Reading Is Its Own Reward | One Cool Thing

Whether it’s a summer reading program for kids, adults, or all ages, librarians often debate the appropriateness of prizes; do they take away from the point by substituting external motivation for internal? But in 2016 and for several years earlier, Iowa’s Lake City Public Library found a clever way to split the difference.

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University of Michigan’s Rachel Vacek Has Solutions for Librarians

Rachel Vacek is Head of Design and Discovery, a department of twelve within the sixty-five person Library Information Technology division at the University of Michigan. In this interview, Vacek shares her approach to excellent user experience in the library.