September 21, 2017

Design for Life

A soaring atrium can offer delight and inspiration. However, atria can also present a platform from which people can do themselves harm. Individuals looking for publicly accessible spaces to conduct self-inflicted violence have sought out libraries, including atria in the San Francisco Public Library’s main branch and the San José State University’s (SJSU) joint public-academic library. On the East Coast, libraries at New York University (NYU) and Brown University have experienced similar tragedies within the past decade.

Great Outdoor Spaces | Library Design

The best libraries don’t stop at the front door. Gardens and green roofs alike are beautiful and inspiring. The benefits of exposure to nature are much more than cosmetic: for individuals, research has related it to reduced stress, inflammation, and mortality; improved memory, job satisfaction, and eyesight; and greater social capital. For communities, successful public outdoor spaces not only improve the physical and mental health of residents, they have been shown to aid the environment, create a stronger sense of community, and even boost the economy.

Librarian Superpowers | Office Hours

Remember this? Essential Skills + Mind-set² x Support = Success. How does the formula for success hold up with an engaged group of international librarians working to build a model of the 21st-century library professional? At the Next Library Conference in Aarhus, Denmark, I found out, along with my workshop coleaders Jan Holmquist, assistant library director, Guldborgsund Public Library, Denmark, and Mylee Joseph, consultant, Public Libraries and Engagement Division, State Library of New South Wales, Australia.

2017 National Book Award Long-Lists Announced

During the week of September 11, the National Book Foundation rolled out its long lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature, revealing its continuing focus on diverse, of-the-moment books while reminding us how rich publishing can be these days. It’s no surprise to see National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing […]

No Time To Waste: Facing the Reality of Climate Breakdown | Editorial

The people of Texas and Louisiana are beginning to rebuild after Harvey, and the library community has stepped up to help. As we have seen in the aftermath of all too many disasters, the library infrastructure and network is critical. Not only do libraries provide refuge and expertise to put to work on relief efforts, but librarians consistently offer compassion and are ready to serve anyone in need.

SPONSORED CONTENT

Training Librarians as Evaluators to Show Library Value

2017 Mover & Shaker honoree Linda Hofschire discusses how librarians can conduct their own original research in order to show library value with SAGE Publishing’s SVP of Global Learning Resources.

Libraries from Puerto Rico to Florida Respond to Hurricane Irma

Arriving hard on the heels of Hurricane Harvey, Irma cut a destructive swath through the northeastern Caribbean and Florida Keys. More than $50 billion worth of damage was reported in the United States, as well as 39 fatalities.

Oculus Virtual Reality Tech Rolls Out in California Libraries

Library shelves have long presented an opportunity for patrons to escape the real world in the pages of a good book. But at libraries all over California, visitors can travel into a whole new reality. Well, a virtual reality, at least.

Digital vs Print: Taking a Position as an Academic Librarian | From the Bell Tower

As collections transition to digital and print finds its way into remote storage sites, how does our profession respond to research that favors print over digital for reading comprehension, learning, and meeting student preferences?

Moving to Management: More a Coach Than a Boss | Blatant Berry

“I love that mea culpa, John!” said the president of the company at which I was working. I had just told the folks at a meeting that a problem had been my fault. I don’t even remember what that problem was, but what the president said was one of the most important lessons of my career.

Participatory Design in Action | The User Experience

Participatory Design (PD) is a method for engaging deeply with users in order to build inclusive, future-oriented, user-centered services. This year I piloted a PD project with a group of four Native American students at Montana State University (MSU) called User Experience with Underrepresented Populations (UXUP). With 650 enrolled Native students, comprising four percent of our student population, this is a growing and important user community for our library.

A Culture of Opportunity | Best Small Library in America 2017

Idaho’s Boundary County Library District is the Best Small Library in America, 2017.

Social Skills | TechKnowledge

In the second quarter of 2017, Facebook grew to more than two billion monthly active users, including 236 million in the United States and Canada—two-thirds of the combined population of those countries. According to a recent report in Forbes, Twitter’s growth has been slowing somewhat, but the number of average monthly active users on the platform grew five percent year-over-year to 328 million worldwide in Q217. According to a recent report in TechCrunch, Instagram has doubled its user base during the past two years, reaching 700 million monthly active users this spring. Social media is where people are online, so libraries need to be there, too.

Kansas City Libraries Defend Free Speech in Face of Arrests, Resignations

Update: In a brief trial on Friday, September 8, Kansas City municipal court judge Joseph Locascio found Steve Woolfolk not guilty by on charges of obstruction, interfering with an arrest, and assaulting a police officer. “Justice was done,” said KCPL director Crosby Kemper III in a statement. “The library, like the judge, has consistently expressed surprise that this ever went to trial, that a public event at a public library should result in the indictment of a librarian.”

After Harvey Libraries Reopen, Organizations Step Up

Over a five-day period, Hurricane Harvey devastated the Gulf Coast area of southeastern Texas and parts of Louisiana. More than 50 inches of rain fell, killing at least 66 people, displacing 30,000 others, and causing up to $190 billion in damages. When skies finally cleared at the end of August, libraries’ cleanup efforts began in earnest.