September 23, 2014

Four Universities Selected as Finalists to Host Obama Library

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The Barack Obama Foundation announced on September 15 that four academic institutions have qualified as potential sites for the Barack Obama Presidential Library. Columbia University, the University of Hawaii, the University of Chicago, and the University of Illinois at Chicago were selected from among a pool of 13 applicants who responded to the Request for Qualifications issued March 2014.

Netherlands: Swets Files For Bankruptcy

A story on the German publishing industry web site boersenblatt.net (in German) reports that Netherlands-based Swets (Royal Swets & Zeitlinger Holding N.V.) is insolvent and has filed for bankruptcy. We’ve reached out the company for comment. With the caveat the mechanical translation is far from perfect, we do learn a bit more by translating the […]

Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

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From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect.

Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

ICONS Pictorial icons (in their largest view, l.) assist customers visually, communicating information at a glance and helping to bridge language barriers. Careful attention was given to the content, instructions, layout, and hierarchy of information displayed to ensure clear communication with a friendly voice. A single color scheme at all locations guarantees consistency. It had to be appropriate and visible in a variety of environments, each with its own interior color choice. The universal icon colors and design make it easy to transfer items among facilities

At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library.

The Policy Gap

The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes.

National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson,  Louise Glück, & More

This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day […]

Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

Rick Anderson

We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with.

Connecting Researchers to New Digital Tools | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl LaGuardia

A couple of months ago I got an email from my colleague Chris Erdmann (Data Scientist Training for Librarians) at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. He wanted to talk about ways librarians could help keep the scholarly community informed about new and developing technologies that could affect its work. He’s been following Thomas Crouzier’s blog, Connected Researchers, and talking with other interested, interesting folks such as Amy Brand at Digital Science. Chris and Amy thought that a discussion among a group of librarians and other stakeholders in the scholarly process could be a promising beginning for brainstorming ideas and strategies.

Washington University Libraries Creates “Documenting Ferguson” Digital Repository

Washington University Libraries Creates “Documenting Ferguson” Digital Repository

The digital repository launched earlier this month is discussed in this announcement from Washington University in St. Louis. From the Announcement: Washington University Libraries, the library system of Washington University in St. Louis, is collecting and preserving photographs, video and other content for the digital repository “Documenting Ferguson.” Free and accessible to all, the online […]

Augmented Library

Augmented Library

In early April 2013, digital journalism professor Robert Hernandez, of the University of Southern California (USC) Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, Los Angeles, was driving by L.A.’s Central Library downtown while thinking of ideas for his experimental augmented reality (AR) storytelling and journalism course when he had an aha moment: Why not focus a project on augmenting the Central Library?

Keeping Library Content Secure | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

Illegally breaking into licensed library content doesn’t require sophisticated hacking skills—just a legitimate network account. Higher education recently discovered such accounts for sale on the Internet. Do we have good options for preventing thefts?

Libraries Welcome Writers in Residence

The Reed Foundation Library and Margo Viscusi Reading Room at Poets House

Libraries have always been second homes to many writers. Two programs are hoping to further encourage that relationship starting this fall and into the future. The Public Library of Cincinnati’s Writer-In-Residence program and the CHP in the Stacks residency program from publishing company Coffee House Press (CHP) will give select writers stipends to do their work in a library while helping publicize that library’s resources to the community.

Queens Library CEO Galante Placed on Administrative Leave

Thomas Galante

Thomas W. Galante, the embattled president and CEO of the Queens Library in New York, on the evening of September 11 was placed on indefinite, paid administrative leave by the library’s recently reorganized board, following months of negative local news coverage regarding his $392,000 salary, his consulting work, library renovation projects that included his office, and an FBI investigation regarding QL’s procedures for awarding construction contracts.

Chattanooga Library Board Responds to Audit’s Allegations

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Last week the board of the Chattanooga Public Library (TN) responded to a city audit released in late August, which criticized Library Director and LJ librarian of the year Corinne Hill and top staffers for receiving excess travel reimbursements (since repaid), and stated that two employees have been reported to the state for suspected fraud for taking paid speaking and consultant jobs on library time.

Pew Report Finds Millennials Are Readers, Library Users

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Younger Americans and Public Libraries examines the ways Millennials—those born between 1985 and 1998—engage with libraries, and how they see libraries’ roles in their lives and communities