April 19, 2015

Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

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Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. With Code Louisville, local employers detail the programming knowledge that applicants will need to fill specific job openings, and sometimes provide mentors to assist in training programs. Using an LFPL card, trainees can access Treehouse online training programs at no cost.

Say What You Really Mean

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Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT
It is time for all women to realize they have the right to say what they truly mean. All of us are responsible for helping women everywhere to find their voices and to listen when they speak. Direct communication transcends boundaries and overcomes obstacles. It builds relationships and clarifies positions. As more women embrace freedom of expression, they will begin to enjoy a quality of life heretofore not achieved. Register Now!

Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl LaGuardia

Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library.

Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary […]

Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons)

More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh in November 2014.

Standards, Frameworks, and the Work We Need To Do

Barbara Fister

The great debate has come to a truce: The new Framework for Information Literacy has been adopted, but will not replace the familiar information literacy Standards, at least for now. This probably frustrates people who strongly support (or oppose) one or the other, but it gives us a chance to work out some sticky issues without anyone feeling that they lost.

Living Libraries: Green that gives back | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

We talk a lot about resilience when we discuss library sustainability. It is one of the trends identified by Miguel Figueroa, an LJ 2005 Mover & Shaker, in the recent “Forecasting the Future of Libraries” report. It encompasses a broad swath of library work—dynamic programming, deep and robust community commitment to the well-being of the institution, and facility design that can withstand the very real threats of extreme weather change that comes with global warming. Resilience also means creating buildings that don’t drain precious natural resources.

Writing To Remember: A 20th-Century Tragedy Inspires a Debut Novel

“Seeking answers, trying to impose meaning, to understand what happened and why are all things I do when I’m writing. So when people ask me if my novel is an act of political activism, I remember what Toni Morrison said…”

Writing To Remember: A 20th-Century Tragedy Inspires a Debut Novel

Writing To Remember: A 20th-Century Tragedy Inspires a Debut Novel

“Seeking answers, trying to impose meaning, to understand what happened and why are all things I do when I’m writing. So when people ask me if my novel is an act of political activism, I remember what Toni Morrison said…”

Get Your Free Ebook Copies of Brian Grazer’s A Curious Mind for National Library Week

Get Your Free Ebook Copies of Brian Grazer’s A Curious Mind for National Library Week

In another example of its expanding ebook outreach to libraries, Simon & Schuster announced that it will donate a free electronic copy of Academy Award–winning producer Brian Grazer’s new book, A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life, to school and public libraries for every ebook or hardcover book sold at retail, up to […]

ALA Releases State of America’s Libraries Report 2015, Includes List of Most Challenged Books of 2014

ALA Releases State of America’s Libraries Report 2015, Includes List of Most Challenged Books of 2014

From an Announcement: According to The State of America’s Libraries Report released today by the American Library Association (ALA), academic, public and school libraries are experiencing a shift in how they are perceived by their communities and society. No longer just places for books, libraries of all types are viewed as anchors, centers for academic […]

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Coleman promoted to Director of Library Experience at Richland Library and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the April 1, 2015 issue of Library Journal.

Connecticut Librarians “Speak Out” About Possibility of Severe Budget Cuts to Library Programs

From the Stamford Advocate: It was in 1973 that things changed dramatically for public libraries in the state. That was when a Connecticard program was created to allow anyone in Connecticut to enter any public library in the state and borrow materials. The program, funded annually by a state grant of about $1 million, has […]

Branching Out

New and renovated library news from San Diego, Detroit, and more from the April 1, 2015 issue of Library Journal.

Beacon Developer NetObjex Enters Library Market with SmartLibrary

NetObjex beacon

Newport Beach, CA-based NetObjex, developer of turnkey “Internet of Things” (IoT) device management solutions for commercial enterprises, recently announced the launch of SmartLibrary, a system that enables libraries to transmit targeted, location-relevant messages to their patrons’ smartphones and mobile devices. The company joins library app developers Capira Technologies and BluuBeam, which each separately announced the launch of beacon services in the fall of 2014.