November 23, 2014

Open Access: Gates Foundation Funded Research Will Require Immediate Free Access to Journal Articles and Underlying Data

From Science Insider: Breaking new ground for the open-access movement, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, a major funder of global health research, plans to require that the researchers it funds publish only in immediate open-access journals. The policy doesn’t kick in until January 2017; until then, grantees can publish in subscription-based journals as long […]

The Off-Site Librarian | One Cool Thing

ON THE TOWN A security camera “captures” a young patron at play (l.); the 100-year-old building 
now stands for library service

When one of the bookmobiles at the Fort Vancouver Regional Library (FVRL), WA, wore out, spending a quarter of a million dollars to buy a new one was not an option. Yet patrons in remote, rural locations in Clark County still needed library service. The innovative solution was the Yacolt Library Express (YLE): a building that is open to the public nearly 70 hours a week, yet staff only spend about ten hours there during the same period.

A Surprise Fiction Win and a Dazzling Le Guin at the National Book Awards 2014

A Surprise Fiction Win and a Dazzling Le Guin at the National Book Awards 2014

On Wednesday, November 19, the National Book Foundation hosted the 2014 National Book Awards—the 65th annual awards—at the cavernous Capriani’s Wall Street in lower Manhattan. The evening featured a surprise win in fiction for Phil Klay’s Redeployment (Penguin Pr.), a first book of stories by a former U.S. Marine who was stationed in Iraq for […]

Simon & Schuster Drops “Buy it Now” Link Requirement on Ebook Borrow and Hold Pages

UPDATE We’ve added comments from Simon & Schuster and the American Library Association since we first posted this item. In June whenSimon & Schuster announced that their complete frontlist and backlist titles would be available to libraries for lending we also learned that S&S was requiring that titles acquired for library lending also include a link […]

Class Warfare over an Uncommon Carrier | Peer to Peer Review

Barbara Fister

The president surprised many people when he added his comments to the 4 million submitted to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) about whether and how the government should set rules that will shape the future of the Internet. What was surprising was that Obama came out with a short but quite pointed outline of what many of us feel would be exactly the right moves to take. Citizens of all political persuasions have strong feeling about the value of keeping the Internet open. How exactly to do that is what’s tricky. Because simplistic metaphors, such as asking whether Internet access is more like cable TV or like electricity, as a recent New York Times article put it, don’t really work, I thought I’d try and untangle what exactly is under debate.

Academic Movers 2014: In Depth with Sarah Sagmoen

Photo by Janelle Gurnsey

In the latest of our In-Depth Interviews with Library Journal Movers & Shakers from academic libraries, sponsored by SAGE, we spoke with Sarah Sagmoen, learning commons and user services librarian at the University of Illinois Springfield’s Brookens Library. Hired as a visiting instructional librarian in 2009, Sagmoen was managing the reference desk and public computers by the end of her first year. In her third year at Brookens, her work inspired the library to create the position she now occupies. Between her academic duties and a lively student outreach program, she is busy building a strong community both inside the library and out.

MLD: Masters in Library Design, Not Science | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

How many LIS program graduates would identify as scientists, ready to conduct experiments and make new discoveries in information theory, practice, and behavior? Probably far fewer than those who get a library job where they practice design.

Indie Client Services Expand, Experiment | PubCrawl

Francine Fialkoff

Several deals in late September and October highlighted continued expansion and new directions among the top three providers of distribution and client services to independent and small publishers: Perseus Books Group, IPG, and Ingram.

It’s About Time | Office Hours

Michael Stephens

“I Don’t Have The Time.” Have you said this in a meeting or a discussion with a colleague? Has this rolled off the tongue when confronted with an unexpected change, a new technology, or another initiative? Many of us are stretched to our limits. I applaud the folks I meet who have absorbed more and more duties as staffing patterns have changed. However, I bristle when I hear the “no time” response, because sometimes I think it’s an excuse.

Money Still Talks!: ALA’s endowment must support its values | Blatant Berry

John Berry III

A few weeks ago several events converged to drive home to me the realization that problems of climate change, global warming, carbon emissions, and a fouled environment, already urgent and dangerous, were accelerating so fast that it’s already too late to correct them.

We Need Diverse Books Announces Publishing Internship Project

We Need Diverse Books Announces Publishing Internship Project

The new WNDB Publishing Internship Project will help support initiatives that give greater opportunities to individuals from diverse backgrounds who wish to begin careers in publishing.

“Beacon” Technology Deployed by Two Library App Makers

Beacons by Estimote

Library app developers Capira Technologies and BluuBeam have separately announced the launch of micro location information services that will enable libraries to send highly targeted, location-relevant messages to Bluetooth-enabled Android and iOS smartphones.

Three Press Directors Weigh in on Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing

up-week_square

As part of University Press week, November 9­­–15, the American Association of University Presses broadcast an online panel on Collaboration in Scholarly Publishing via Google Hangouts. Moderated by Jennifer Howard, a senior reporter at the Chronicle of Higher Education, the panel featured Peter Dougherty, director of Princeton University Press; Barbara Kline Pope, AAUP president and the executive director for The National Academies Press; and Ron Chrisman, director of the University of North Texas Press.

Focus on Relevance: Tell politicians why libraries are vital | Editorial

Rebecca T. Miller

Not long after Republican Kim Wyman was elected secretary of state of Washington in 2012, she had a meeting with a legislator that set her on a new course. As they began to explore the possibility of rebooting an envisioned but later abandoned Heritage Center project, she was asked, “Are libraries necessary?” It’s a great question. Her response should be a prod to all of us to get out there and make sure our elected officials have the insight into libraries they need to help build and sustain strong funding.

#timetoread for National Readathon Day

National_Readathon_Day_poster

Ask anyone who loves books about the most challenging aspect of being a reader, and the answer you’ll inevitably hear is: There’s never enough time to read. Fortunately for book enthusiasts everywhere, this January Penguin Random House will be teaming up with the National Book Foundation, GoodReads, and Mashable to encourage readers across the country to take four dedicated hours to read—for a good cause.