December 9, 2016

ALA in ATL | ALA Midwinter Preview 2017

ljx161201webmidwinter1

From the opening session with political comedian W. Kamau Bell through the closing keynote by actor Neil Patrick Harris, the American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting sets an ambitious agenda, tackling timely political issues such as how to work with the new presidential administration and Congress; ongoing social concerns like equity and inclusion; and how best to drive the continuing technological transformation of libraries on the one hand and accurately assess our successes—and learn from our failures—on the other.

Time to Change Everything Again…For Generation Z | From the Bell Tower

Steven Bell

We were told we needed to change to adapt to Gen X and Millennials. Get ready to change again. Gen Z is on the way to our libraries. A new survey offers some insights into what we need to know.

Deliberate Resistance | Sustainability

untitled

Resilience: to bounce back after disruption. We’ve dealt with a lot of disruption as libraries and citizens in the past year. From a pretty insane presidential race to a major nationwide Internet outage caused by a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that harnessed the Internet of Things to hurricanes, drought, and forest fires, we’ve got disruption in just about every sector of modern life.

Queensland Library Releases Open Source Comics Tool

openlibcomic

A new tool from Australia’s State Library of Queensland can make a cartoonist out of even the least artistically inclined. The Fun Palaces comics maker lets users place a set of ready-made images into panels, then write their own word balloons to develop a fully fleshed out four panel comic.

A New Library Card for Rep. John Lewis | Picture of the Week

Staff at the Fairfax County (VA) Library sent a new library card to “March” trilogy author John Lewis, who was denied one in 1956 because of his race.

Community Conveners

lj_communityconveners_thumbnail125x125

Wednesday, December 14th, 2016, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT
Past winners of the LibraryAware Community Award share their stories of how deep engagement with community needs won them the honor, and how they’ve since leveraged it to drive more positive change and put the library front and center.
Register Now!

Smith College Library Redesign Engages Maya Lin, Shepley Bulfinch

West elevation, Neilson Library renovation 
© 2016 Maya Lin Studio

On October 14 architect Maya Lin unveiled her plans for the new William Allan Neilson Library at Smith College, Northampton, MA. The drawings and model for the extensive renovation of the library, which will include upgrades and alterations to the original building and the replacement of two previous additions, were met with approval by the gathering of students, faculty, and administration at Smith’s Sweeney Concert Hall—not surprising, as they were only part of a years-long visioning process that involved thousands of the college’s community members from campus to town.

Aspiration to Action | Diversity 2016

ljx161201webdiversityslugbig

What can we do? This has to be one of the most commonly asked questions in America—even before the recent presidential election brought a wave of hate crimes more pervasive than the one that followed the September 11 attacks. The ongoing impact of bigotry in America is, perhaps, the quintessential “wicked problem.” A legacy of housing discrimination continues to shape neighborhoods—and how they are served by schools, police, and, yes, libraries—to this day. Studies continue to show implicit bias along lines of race and gender that impacts hiring, promotion, compensation, and retention—and explicit bias is still with us. All of these factors feed one another, eluding simple solutions to any that leave the others out of the equation.

Building Equity from the Ground Up | Diversity 2016

ljx161201webdiversityslugbig2

The County of Los Angeles Public Library believes diverse programming begins with assembling a team of people from various backgrounds and cultures who can offer different perspectives, ideas, and out-of-the-box solutions that appeal to a wider swath of the population. Diverse teams are helping to guide the organization toward its goal of reducing barriers and increasing access to the ten million residents (3.5 million in its designated service area) of the County of Los Angeles, itself a diverse group: 26.6 percent white, 9.1 percent African American, 48.4 percent Latinx, and 15 percent Asian.

Q & A with Katrina M. Sanders | Diversity 2016

ljx161201webdiversityverma

Early in 2017, Adam Matthew, a database vendor known for its collections of digitized historical primary sources, will release a new collection called Race Relations. The database will offer access to a trove of previously undigitized civil rights material from the Race Relations Department of the United Church Board for Homeland Ministries, 1943–70, an organization that was based at Fisk University in Nashville and whose records are now housed at the Amistad Center at Tulane University in New Orleans. Chianta Dorsey, an archivist at the Amistad Center, explains, “The formal program of the department began in 1943 as a forum to engage in a national discussion regarding numerous topics including racial and ethnic relationships, economics, education, government policy, housing and employment.”

Coming Together Around a Divided Past | Diversity 2016

FROM WRITER TO READERS (l.–r.): Author Tanner Colby addresses program participants, while students from a Race Project KC bus tour process their impressions together. Photos courtesy of Johnson County PL

When youth specialist Mary Shortino at the Johnson County Public Library (JCPL), a suburban system near Kansas City, KS, read Tanner Colby’s Some of My Best Friends Are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America (Penguin Bks.), she got excited. About a quarter of the book is about Kansas City, where racial real estate covenants first began, and the specialist, who is in her 50s, remembered when the city’s schools were first integrated. Shortino pulled in Angel Tucker, youth services manager of JCPL, and the two went to see Colby speak nearby in Kansas City, MO. Colby’s response to meeting them, says Tucker, was, “ ‘I should’ve come to your library,’ ” and with that, a collaboration was born.

Reworking the Workforce | Diversity 2016

Librarianship, as a field, has a major diversity problem. According to the American Library Association’s Diversity Counts, in 2009–10 (the most recent year for which we have numbers), 85.2 percent of credentialed librarians and 72 percent of library assistants were white. Two years ago, St. Paul faced a similar problem. Citywide, the workforce was 82 percent white. Yet the city population is only 60 percent white, and the school age population, 22 percent white.

Experience Success | Diversity 2016

ljx161201webdiversitypeet

As higher education grows increasingly more aware of the need to diversify its workforce, academic libraries are developing new strategies to lower barriers in hiring and retain librarians from a wide range of ­backgrounds.

Learning from History | Diversity 2016

AT THE TABLE Nashville police trainees in NPL’s Civil Rights Room. 
Photo courtesy of Nashville PL

Police bias against people of color, particularly black people, has been one of the most heated issues of the past few years, with killings by officers of unarmed black people in cities across the country serving as the impetus behind the formation of the Black Lives Matter movement. Some might think there’s not much role for libraries in fixing this problem, beyond helping users find reliable data and texts that address it.

Making the Library an Asset for Your Local Elected Officials

generic-infographic-page-001

While we’re all dealing with presidential election overload and exhaustion, we can’t ever lose sight of the importance of making our libraries an asset to our local elected officials.