September 19, 2014

Opinion: Rethinking How We Rate and Rank MLIS Programs | LIS Education

screen shot of Time to Degree table

Throughout the United States and Canada, there are more than 63 ALA-accredited programs offering advanced degrees in library and information science. While the number of programs has grown over the years, the field has yet to develop any significant, rigorous measures of evaluation to assess them. Even as interest in LIS education grows, the tools for determining which programs will match a student’s goals or establishing a hierarchy of quality remain stuck in neutral.

Meet the Candidates: ALA President 2015-16

Maggie Farrell left, Sari Feldman right

The campaign to elect the 2015-2016 President of the American Library Association (ALA) ends this month. To help inform ALA members who haven’t yet voted, and to give other librarians some additional insight into key issues currently on the ALA agenda, LJ asked each of the candidates to respond to five questions. The candidates, Maggie Farrell, dean of libraries at the University of Wyoming, Laramie, and Sari Feldman, executive director of the Cuyahoga County Public Library, Parma, Ohio, responded. (Full biographies of both candidates are available on the ALA Election Guide.)

ALA Withdraws Accreditation from SCSU MLS Program

After years of struggling to get its house in order, the Masters of Library Science (MLS) program at Southern Connecticut State University (SCSU) lost its American Library Association (ALA) accreditation last week. While faculty and administrators hope to take the withdrawal as an opportunity to focus their efforts at revitalizing the troubled program, the withdrawal of ALA accreditation is a serious blow to the school.

ALA Accountability and Accreditation of LIS Programs | Backtalk

lecture-hall

Michael Kelley’s April 29, 2013 editorial “Can We Talk about the MLS?” and the 157 comments posted to that article so far prompted us to consider accountability for the American Library Association’s (ALA) accreditation of graduate programs in library and information science. The ALA Standards emphasize what programs must accomplish in terms of strategic planning and student learning outcomes. ALA does not dictate what those outcomes should be nor does it specify any particular courses that must be offered in an MLIS program. So, what does it mean to be a graduate of an ALA accredited program?

ALA Renews Full Accreditation for Three Schools; Grants Two Conditional Status

The Committee on Accreditation (COA) of the American Library Association (ALA) granted continued accreditation status to Indiana University, Louisiana State University, and the University of Southern Mississippi’s library and information science masters programs. All three universities are scheduled for their new comprehensive review in 2019. Conditional accreditation status was granted to the University at Buffalo, […]