November 21, 2017

Dallas Public Library “Dedicated to Serving with Compassion” After Shooting

Residents of Dallas pulled together in their grief and anger Friday morning after five police officers were killed at a peaceful downtown demonstration Thursday night. All 29 branches of the Dallas Public Library (DPL) were open, despite the initial fear that the alleged shooter, who was killed by police, had planted explosives in the downtown area.

Knight Foundation Names Second Library News Challenge Winners | ALA Annual 2016

In a June 25 session at the ALA Annual conference in Orlando, John Bracken, VP of media innovation for the Knight Foundation, said that the foundation has been focused on three key questions when working with libraries: What can be done to foster cross-discipline collaboration, possibly learning from projects in other civic sectors such as Code for America, 18F, or the Knight-Mozilla OpenNews collaboration; how can community be put “even more robustly” at the center of the foundation’s work; and how can the foundation help libraries tell their stories to wider audiences? “To succeed, particularly in a time of reduced public investment, it is vital to tell our stories in ways that people can understand the breadth of our work, and on platforms” where the public is present and listening, Bracken said.

DPL Spins Patrons Right Round | One Cool Thing

The Dallas Public Library (DPL) found a way to publicize its hidden vinyl record collection, clear its shelves of items that needed weeding, make some money, celebrate the J. Erik Jonsson Central Library’s 33rd anniversary, and show its patrons a good time—all at once. On the evening of September 17, 2015, the library held a record sale and party, complete with a DJ, refreshments, and a cash bar, dubbed the 33 1/3 party in honor of both the branch’s birthday and the revolutions per minute speed of LP records. The event “was really fun,” said organizer Heather Lowe, manager of DPL’s fine arts division, “much better attended than in our wildest dreams.” Thousands of weeded records were put up for sale at $2 apiece, with a 25 album per person limit. At the end of the evening, the library had netted more than $6,000.