October 23, 2017

Digital vs Print: Taking a Position as an Academic Librarian | From the Bell Tower

As collections transition to digital and print finds its way into remote storage sites, how does our profession respond to research that favors print over digital for reading comprehension, learning, and meeting student preferences?

News from the Show Floor | ALA Annual 2017

The American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference, held this year at Chicago’s McCormick Place convention center, June 22-27, included a number of announcements and product launches from library vendors. Here are a few that LJ had the opportunity to learn about in person.

EU Court: Treat Ebooks like Print Books

The Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) has been making some interesting decisions that could affect libraries. A few weeks ago, it was liability for hyperlinking; this week it’s about ebooks and lending.

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Vanessa Irvin Preaches the Art of Storytelling to Future Librarians

“We are all walking stories, so it’s vital that as librarians, we learn the art of listening to story…” says Irvin, an assistant professor in the library and information science program at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. “[We need to be] willing to share our own stories so that we best relate to patrons, communities, and stakeholders.”

Ignacio Albarracin | Movers & Shakers 2015 — Digital Developers

Ignacio Albarracin, digital services coordinator at San Antonio Public Library (SAPL), knew the library’s digital resources were woefully underused. Albarracin wanted to change that. “We decided…to target potential users in a strategic setting where we could get [their] full attention—San Antonio International Airport,” he says.

Kindle or Print? Librarians Weigh In | Not Dead Yet

I don’t feel comfortable without a book nearby (a print book, that is). And the older I get, the more books I read at the same time; I’m usually in the midst of two or three. This is no boast, because I’ve religiously avoided reading serious literature ever since the course that required me to read Nausea and The Death of Ivan Illyich in the same week. Now I read mostly mysteries, which I could argue are, in fact, serious literature, but I don’t because then I wouldn’t want to read them anymore. I get a lot of paperbacks from Amazon, especially since I recently discovered how cheaply I can get used paperbacks there (I also get lots of used paperbacks from the Harvard Bookstore in the interest of supporting brick and mortar bookstores). Then one of my favorite mystery writers released a novella only in a Kindle version available through Amazon. I broke down, downloaded the Kindle app to my laptop, bought the novella, and read it online.

Short Fiction is Cool Again: Tor.com Announces Inaugural Novella List

Last summer Tor.com, which has been publishing original short fiction on its site, announced a new imprint “dedicated to publishing the best novellas and short novels from emerging writers as well as established authors.” On February 12, it released its initial list of titles.

Survey: Library Ebook Growth Slowing but Still Substantial

Ninety-five percent of public libraries currently offer ebooks to patrons, up from 72 percent in 2010, and 89 percent in both 2012 and 2013. However, money remains the biggest impediment for libraries looking to add ebooks or expand collections, according to Library Journal’s fifth annual Ebook Usage in U.S. Public Libraries report, sponsored by Freading.

OverDrive API Usage Indicates Growth of Ebook Checkouts via OPAC

OverDrive is currently processing 350 million API server calls per month, and has supported 1.3 million checkouts via APIs to date in 2014, according to internal data given to LJ. API use has also risen steadily each quarter, with almost 233,000 checkouts during the first three months of the year, more than 529,000 in Q2, an estimated 692,000 in Q3, and a projection of at least 1 million during the final three months of the year.

Librarians, IT Experts Respond to Adobe Spying Accusations

Adobe this week confirmed reports that it has been logging data on the reading activity of people who use the free Adobe Digital Editions service, and that the company has been transmitting those logs to its servers as unencrypted text files, raising privacy and security concerns.