November 24, 2017

Connecting in Chicago | ALA Midwinter Preview 2015

There will be more than enough information and action at the 2015 Midwinter Meeting and Exhibits (MW) of the American Library Association (ALA) to make it worth the cost and time for any library worker to attend. It features a sparkling array of celebrities and authors, a massive exhibit show floor at McCormick Place, a pile of jobs and opportunities, a packed schedule of meetings, the fantastic city of Chicago, and, best of all, plenty of chances to booze and schmooze with peers, colleagues, vendors, and new professional friends.

Schmoozing for Beginners | ALA Midwinter Preview 2015

Professional networking and schmoozing are two of the most important skills a librarian can have. They are not taught in MLIS programs, and being proficient at both was one of the hardest lessons I had to learn. In order to get the projects done in my community that I was passionate about, move my library forward, and garner political support, I realized that I needed to take advantage of the many professional and political social opportunities going on around me. Over several years I worked hard to learn how to connect whenever an opportunity arose. The following are things that I’ve learned by watching other people, by reading and learning about networking, and from what has worked for me at events when I don’t know anyone.

Cuisine: Chicago-Style | ALA Midwinter Preview 2015

Restaurant review and travel publisher Fodor’s shared the following selection of dining choices with LJ’s readers. Prices listed are the average cost for a main dinner entrée, excluding taxes. The area around McCormick Place has plenty of low-key eateries, but if you’d rather find a spot that locals love and newcomers consider well worth a short taxi ride, head to these Fodor’s-recommended locales in the nearby South Loop and Chinatown areas.

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Buthod retired as Director of the Louisville Free Public Library, KY; Kate Nevins announced her retirement as Executive Director at LYRASIS, Jennifer Wann is now Director, Bolivar County Library System, Cleveland, MS; and more people news from the December 2014 issue of Library Journal.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, December 2014 Issue

Speaking up about sexual harassment; librarianship as a second career; to warn or not to warn; what’s wanted from ebooks, and more letters to the editor from the December 2014 issue of Library Journal.

An Edwardian Education | Collection Development: After Downton Abbey

PBS’s popular Downton Abbey has made the early 1900s a familiar and beloved setting. These 36 titles will help patrons find Edwardian-era fiction, nonfiction, and videos.

Repair or Replace ALA/APA!: Professional organization or tax dodge? | Blatant Berry

The American Library Association’s (ALA)Allied Professional Association (APA) recently sent a message to the members of the ALA Council and other “member leaders.” With the help of Al Kagan, who represents ALA’s Social Responsibilities Round Table on Council, we saw the message and were reminded that since APA’s founding in 2001, we have never fully understood what it is or does, whether it is a real association or just a tax dodge.

Conspiring to Educate: Working together for transitioning students

Today’s learners have more options than ever on their paths to education, but they will also encounter more obstacles. We may live in an age of access to information, but it’s becoming increasingly easy for students to miss out on crucial information during their middle and high school years—a high school diploma is no guarantee that they will be prepared for the requirements of college—and after graduation, especially for those who do not go on to higher education. Working as partners, however, different types of libraries can join forces to help students bridge the gap from high school to higher ed to the workforce while remaining a viable part of their lives.

Getting Real About Privacy: Confidentiality, digital literacy, and beyond | Editorial

We need to reexamine how we talk about privacy. It’s hard to go a day right now without seeing a major article addressing privacy concerns—be it about personal financial data; the ability to track student progress and report it to parents, teachers, or advisors; new Facebook settings; the stalled USA Freedom Act; and so on. The alarm has been sounded, but the prevailing lack of response is still unnerving.