November 16, 2017

Feedback: Letters to LJ, December 2015 Issue

Educate about guns, don’t forget the not-yet employed, short fiction for libraries, and more letters to the December 2015 issue of Library Journal.

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Pete Petruski named Executive Director, Library System of Lancaster County, PA, Donald L. Gilstrap named Dean of the University of Alabama Libraries, Tuscaloosa, and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the December 2015 issue of Library Journal.

Branching Out | December 2015

The North Miami Public Library completed its $1.5 million renovation, ground was broken for the new South Central Regional Library, Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL), KY, and more new construction and renovation news from the December 2015 issue of Library Journal.

Idealism Reawakened: A former student rejuvenates an old editor | Blatant Berry

One of the joys of teaching is reconnecting with students years later as they pursue their careers. I recently had lunch and a long discussion with Patti Foerster, who had been a student a decade ago in my class at Dominican University’s Graduate School of Library & Information Science, River Forest, IL.

Linux Privacy Essentials | Field Reports

Providing Internet access to the public has come to be an important service, but it can be quite a challenge to do so in a secure, cost-effective way. Maintaining patron privacy on a shared, public computer is one of the problems that librarians face every day. My solution was to switch to an open source (OS) platform for our patron computing.

Bringing Boston In | Design4Impact

The average age of users in the newly renovated second floor of Boston Public Library’s (BPL) Johnson Building has come down at least a decade, and it’s easy to see why. Philip Johnson’s massive addition to BPL’s iconic Beaux-Arts style McKim Building opened in 1972. According to the BPL website, the requests for the exterior were that the building should “observe the existing roof line of the McKim Building, and to use material (Milford granite) that would harmonize with the exterior of the existing Central Library building.” The result was a Brutalist monolith, experimental in structure and stark in aesthetic.

Boston Bound | ALA Midwinter Preview 2016

There is no better city than Boston in which to hold the first professional conference of the election year. This is especially true for the Midwinter Meeting and Exhibits of the American Library Association (ALA), to be held January 8–12, 2016.

From Patchwork to Network: Taking a wide view on infrastructure | Editorial

I’ve been thinking a lot about libraries as infrastructure and why we—as voters and taxpayers—don’t demand that our dollars be used for their upkeep and refurbishment to meet changing needs and help spur community growth. Libraries usually do well at the polls, and this year is no exception, with the majority of bonds passing. The local nature of libraries obscures the larger view: a varied patchwork of support for a national treasure. Several things have me thinking there may be a way to reshape the local conversation against the national backdrop.

Better Together: The Cohort Model of Professional Development

Higher ed is changing fast right now, and so is librarianship. Traditional in-person library and information science (LIS) education provided students with a robust network of peers for support. Over the last couple of decades, however, trends in higher education have reduced that automatic peer group—not only asynchronous online courses but also “unbundling,” in which students take classes at their own pace and from a variety of institutions. Postgraduate professional development opportunities, ranging from one-day conferences to workshops to certificate programs, were already more isolated, and these, too, have felt the further distancing impact of the digital shift. In addition, the proliferation of new competencies in librarianship can mean that a given librarian’s coworkers may have few if any points of overlap with what they do every day or need to learn—especially if they’re the sole representative on staff of a new library function.