November 20, 2017

A Moving Target | One Cool Thing

When UTAH’s Park City Library closed for renovations for 12 to 15 months in May 2014, staff had the usual big question to answer: What do we do with the materials? In Park City, the situation was particularly challenging because there were no branches to which materials could be moved and no buildings in the city large enough to house the complete collection. Staying open during the renovation proved impossible. However, the town’s 8,500 residents—and some three million visitors, attracted by skiing and the Sundance Film Festival—still needed access.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, June 1, 2015 Issue

Representing small libraries, book kids like in schools, and Hugo Awards controversy in the letters to the editor from the June 1, 2015 issue of Library Journal

Library People News | June 1, 2015

Bailey appointed Director of the Morgan Library & Museum, Bero named Executive Director of Algonquin Area Public Library District, Kirchner to be University Librarian at York University, and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the June 1, 2015 issue of Library Journal

Branching Out, June 2015

Chula Vista Public Library, CA, opened community space, the Hub; renovation of the Jamaica Plain Branch of the Boston Public Library will begin on August 1, and more new construction and renovation news from the June 1, 2015 issue of Library Journal.

Still Invisible: Despite decades of advocacy, libraries are… | Blatant Berry

Enjoying retirement, I was watching my second old flick on TCM when Lillian Gerhardt called. She is the former editor of School Library Journal, and we worked together for a decade or more many years ago. Both of us were totally engaged, maybe obsessed, with libraries and the profession and addicted American Library Association (ALA) critics. I was happy to hear that, like me, she was still watching the association. This time she urged me to comment on “The Advocacy Continuum” by ALA executive director Keith Fiels in the May issue of American Libraries (p. 6–7).

All-In Start-up for Libraries | Library Leadership

Government services, such as public libraries, are often told to run their organizations “like a business.” However, when a start-up takes a risk and fails, it’s considered part of the business’s evolution. Whereas when a library takes a risk and fails, the entire program can be seen as wasteful. Can the director of a library afford to don the black mock turtleneck of a visionary entrepreneur like Steve Jobs and still stay ­employed?

3-D Printers | Product Spotlight

It isn’t surprising that 3-D printers are often mentioned in the same breath as library Maker spaces. “Additive manufacturing” technology is about 30 years old, but as it becomes more refined, as well as more affordable, its growing importance to engineering and prototyping appears to be inevitable, as well as its use in everything from medicine to haute cuisine. Meanwhile, during the past few years, dozens of small desktop units have become available, most priced out of reach for casual users but within the means of many libraries interested in offering their communities access to new technologies.

A Taste of San Francisco | ALA 2015 Preview

San Francisco is deservedly known for its restaurant offerings. No conference preview could cover them all (and no conference attendee could visit them). Below is a tasting menu of options that are accessible from the Moscone Center, at 747 Howard Street, provided courtesy of San Francisco local Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House’s Crown Publishing Group.

Literary Landmarks | ALA 2015 Preview

While it is tough to get away from the conference long enough to experience the host city, and there’s a lot to see in San Francisco, here are a few literary-inflected sights courtesy of Not for Tourists that visiting librarians might especially appreciate.

Fog City Reads | ALA 2015 Preview

The city of San Francisco has been immortalized in hundreds of books in every genre: the San Francisco Public Library (SFPL) keeps a Pinterest page of 81 titles and counting, as well as a “literary landmarks of San Francisco” list in its BiblioCommons catalog, plus separate lists for SF-based chefs and books for kids and teens. Here, a curated selection of reading for those ALA attendees who like to immerse themselves in a sense of place while they travel to the conference.