September 22, 2017

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Judith Tolchin to Direct Monmouth County Library System, NJ; Sarah A. Norris named Scholarly Communication Librarian at the University of Central Florida Libraries, Orlando; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the October 1, 2015 issue of Library Journal.

Branching Out, October 2015

Two new branches at Atlanta-Fulton; Ringling College of Art & Design is a year ahead of schedule, and more new construction and renovation from the October 1, 2015, issue of Library Journal.

By the People: The library future resides in users’ perception | Blatant Berry

The history of the public library in America has just been rewritten, and the result provides crucial new tools to help guarantee its future. This new history comes from Wayne A. Wiegand’s new book, Part of Our Lives: A People’s History of the American Public Library (Oxford Univ., Oct. 2015).

Feedback: Letters to LJ, October 1, 2015 Issue

A librarian for LC, apathy a bigger threat, community needs in Berkeley, and more letters to the October 1, 2015 issue of Library Journal.

The Personal Touch | Readers’ Advisory

The goal of the My Librarian program at Multnomah County Library (MCL), Portland, OR, launched in April 2014, is to create a virtual space that ignites that same spark of connection and delight that patrons experience when they engage in person with library staff about books, thus building relationships and community and providing service at the patron’s point of need.

Activate Partners To Grow Circ | Brand Insider

The aim of merchandising is to make each library’s collection as effective as possible. Great merchandising forms the bridge between the library and the patron—it helps readers discover books beyond the best sellers on the holds shelf. The challenge for libraries is that merchandising is a specialty in its own right.

UX Means You | The User Experience

At the end of our 2014 book, Useful, Usable, Desirable: Applying User Experience Design to Your Library, Amanda Etches and I left readers with what we consider to be an important and inspiring ­message: “Every decision we make affects how people experience the library. Let’s make sure we’re creating improvements.”

Altmetrics Ambassadors | Academic Libraries

“Altmetrics: A manifesto,” published five years ago this month, described an academic publishing landscape in which the volume of literature was exploding, and the three traditional filters used to help researchers gauge the relative importance of individual papers in their fields—peer review, citation counting, and a journal’s average citations per article—were failing to keep up. Scholars were moving their work onto the web, and alternative, article-level metrics drawn from online reference managers Zotero and Mendeley, scholarly social bookmarking services such as CiteULike, or even page-views of blogs and “likes” or comments on mainstream social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter could be used to track the impact of new research in real time, wrote ­Impactstory ­cofounder Jason Priem; Wikimedia Foundation head of research Dario ­Taraborelli; Paul Groth, then-researcher VU University Amsterdam; and Cameron Neylon, then–senior scientist at the Science and Technology Facilities Council. Could these new metrics be just as relevant as peer review and citations when judging the impact and influence of new research?

Real-World Barriers: Expanding on a Tradition of Access | Editorial

Libraries are all about access to information in its many forms, and librarians have a long and admirable tradition of striving to increase that access whenever they can. Several recent events have spurred me to think about real-world barriers—visible and invisible—and how seeing them in light of access to the library could influence services.

Charleston Connections | Charleston Conference Preview 2015

The theme of this year’s Charleston Conference, SC, November 4–7, is “Where Do We Go from Here”—and, really, isn’t that the perfect articulation of the underlying theme of every library conference? But as LJ’s John Berry said in last year’s Charleston preview (“Uniquely Hospitable,” LJ 10/1/15, p. 38ff.), no matter what changes each year brings, the under­lying focus of Charleston remains “Issues in Book and Serial Acquisition” for academic and research librarians. As Big Deals shrink and journal prices rise, ljx151001webCharleston2acquisition models proliferate, and monographs join articles in the open access funding fray, there is no shortage of such concerns for attendees to sink their teeth into, in and around enjoying the famous foodie offerings of the host city.