June 26, 2017

Branching Out, April 2016

The new Christa McAuliffe Branch of the Framingham Public Library, MA, opened; the Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, underwent renovation for its Digital Scholarship Laboratory; and more new construction and renovation news from the April 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Cheryl LaGuardia awarded the 2016 Isadore Gilbert Mudge Award; Bridget Quinn-Carey appointed CEO of Hartford Public Library, CT; Jacqueline Solis now Director of Research and Instructional Services at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Library; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the March 15, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

The Courage To Inform: Our mission requires brave librarians | Blatant Berry

When a library offers balanced information from both poles on local or national issues, reaction from either side can be unpleasant, even hostile, to the library and to library support. It is even worse when the citizens are part of the oldest American movement, the one that asserts that all government is evil—even public agencies such as the library. It is a courageous librarian who delivers facts that offer an opposing view to that one.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, April 1, 2016 Issue

Writing simply isn’t simple, fixing fines, a challenge to ALA members, and more letters to editor from the April 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

To Float or Not To Float | Collection Management

Most libraries that adopt floating collections expect circulation to rise because collections will be better distributed to meet patron demand. Yet how many have analyzed whether collections perform better after implementing floating than they did before materials were relocated? The Nashville Public Library undertook an experiment in floating with optimism. Did the results pay off? Here is how it all began.

Hollywood Is a Verb | Programs That Pop

“Don’t you love the Oxford dictionary? When I first read it, I thought it was a really, really long poem about everything,” said David Bowie in 1999. In “Hollywood Is a Verb: Los Angeles Tackles the Oxford English Dictionary [OED],” more than 60 programs engaged Angelenos through conversation and events to illuminate how dictionaries enrich our lives today. The title of the program, jointly presented by the Library Foundation of Los Angeles and the Los Angeles Public Library (LAPL), was inspired by L.A. artist Ed Ruscha and his paintings of the same name.

Data-Driven Design | The User Experience

My two most recent columns shared some background about a librarywide UX improvement project at North Carolina’s Chapel Hill Public Library (CHPL), as well as some actual projects on which we’re working. Now I want to spend some time on the role of data.

Librarians Need Global Credentials | Backtalk

Until there is a body to take responsibility for reviewing LIS programs globally and granting the strong ones accreditation, a large number of librarians will be banned de facto from participating in our increasingly mobile information age economy. Having been a sometimes struggling expat myself (I lived in the UK and in Taiwan before Texas and the UAE), I know a little about trying to find work abroad; it can be a hell of a lot harder than it was for me, especially if you’re brown-skinned and English isn’t your first language. An international standard for accreditation for LIS degrees would go a long way toward fixing this for librarians in the eastern and southern hemispheres who want a fair shot at jobs in the northern and western hemispheres and in the complex, frustrating, bewildering, and lucrative Middle East.

All Systems Go | Library Systems Landscape 2016

The year saw an evolving process of innovation, integration, and iteration, as companies and products morph into next-level services.

Open Invitation | Library Systems Landscape 2016

The development and launch of Koha by New Zealand’s Horowhenua Library Trust and Katipo Communications 16 years ago and the creation of Evergreen by the Georgia Public Library Service (GPLS) in 2006 were greeted with a lot of enthusiasm by the library field. Whether generated in-house, or purchased from a commercial vendor, integrated library systems (ILS) have always been costly, and, in theory, the prospect of libraries collaboratively working on open source systems held a lot of promise. In some ways, these solutions are still living down the early hype.