June 26, 2017

News Briefs for August 1, 2016

The American Association of Geographers will donate its archives to the Library of Congress; Indianapolis Public Library has received its second “Library of the Future” award from ALA; the University of Cincinnati will form a new academic press; and more News in Brief from the August 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Susan Fliss has been named Dean of Libraries at Smith College, Northampton, MA; Richard Kong voted next director of Skokie Public Library, IL; recent LIS grad Olivia Masser to be director of the Milton Public Library, PA; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the August 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, August 2016 Issue

A call for academic RA research, the unchanging lack of inclusion, and more letters to editor from the August 2016 issue of Library Journal.

We Talked About Failure | BackTalk

The Utah Library Association (ULA) dove headfirst into failure on February 19–20. Along with the Salt Lake City Public Library (SLCPL), ULA hosted Strikethrough: The Utah Library Association Failure Workshop. Billed as an interdisciplinary discussion of failure for librarians, it brought together librarians, medical doctors, and performance artists.

Write Here | Programming

Everyone has a book in them, it’s said. While Christopher Hitchens completed that phrase with “in most cases that’s where it should stay,” it doesn’t seem the public agrees. This is dramatically demonstrated by the expansion of U.S. publishing, as measured by Bowker, the U.S. issuer of ISBNs, the numbers that help track book sales. In 2002, Bowker issued 247,777. In 2012 (the most recent figures available), demand rose to 2,352,797—an increase of 2,105,020, or a whopping 849.5 percent.

Making Libraries Visible on the Web | The Digital Shift

In Library: An Unquiet History, historian and curatorial fellow for Harvard’s metaLAB Matthew Battles describes Melvil Dewey’s impatience with inefficiency in library work in the 1870s. “To Dewey, local interests and special needs were less important than the efficient movement of books into the hands of readers,” he writes. That crisp statement of purpose should be an inspiration to the current discussions around making library collections and programs visible and available on the web.

The Research Journey | Office Hours

Since 2014, academic librarians from across the United States have gathered at Loyola Marymount University (LMU) in Los Angeles to be part of an immersive learning experience—the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL).

Life in the Bike Lane: Designing livable cities from the street up | Editorial

On Leap Day this past February, I gave myself the gift of a Citi Bike membership. In New York City, where Library Journal’s office is located, this bike-sharing service hit the streets in 2013 and has continued to gain traction ever since. Like many, it has had growing pains, but it now touts over 100,000 annual members, and this summer it celebrated a record of 56,000 trips in one day. I ride for part of my commute, replacing what would be an underground subway leg with three-plus miles on the surface. This has given New York back to me, reinvigorating my relationship with the city and allowing me to witness its changeable beauty.