March 29, 2017

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill, appoints Dayna Durbin and Rebecca Smyrl; Terry Manuel named State Librarian and Commissioner of Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives; Michelle Perera is Director of Pasadena Public Library and Information Services Department, CA; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the December 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, December 2016 Issue

Bringing employees to the table, parajumpers and ex-programmers, “What do you do for fun?”, and more letters to editor from the December 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

News Briefs for December 2016

Harvard University Press extends agreements with PubFactory; Loudoun County PL, VA, earns National Association of Counties Achievement Award; James C. Jernigan Library at Texas A&M University–Kingsville named the 2016 Federal Depository Library of the Year; and more News in Brief from the December 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Inspired by Serving Others: The rewards are unrelated to the bottom line | Blatant Berry

John Berry III

Nick Higgins emailed me the other day. He was a student in my class at what is now called the School of Information at the Pratt Institute in New York City, graduating in 2008. One of the joys of teaching is the continuing contact with students as they progress through their careers. In our profession that contact is especially gratifying.

VHS Copyright and Due Diligence | Field Reports

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In the mid-1970s, the advent of the VHS format revolutionized the ability of libraries to collect and loan film. Now, collections developed during the 25-plus years of the format’s dominance present an impending crisis.

ALA in ATL | ALA Midwinter Preview 2017

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From the opening session with political comedian W. Kamau Bell through the closing keynote by actor Neil Patrick Harris, the American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting sets an ambitious agenda, tackling timely political issues such as how to work with the new presidential administration and Congress; ongoing social concerns like equity and inclusion; and how best to drive the continuing technological transformation of libraries on the one hand and accurately assess our successes—and learn from our failures—on the other.

Deliberate Resilience | Sustainability

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Resilience: to bounce back after disruption. We’ve dealt with a lot of disruption as libraries and citizens in the past year. From a pretty insane presidential race to a major nationwide Internet outage caused by a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that harnessed the Internet of Things to hurricanes, drought, and forest fires, we’ve got disruption in just about every sector of modern life.

Aspiration to Action | Diversity 2016

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What can we do? This has to be one of the most commonly asked questions in America—even before the recent presidential election brought a wave of hate crimes more pervasive than the one that followed the September 11 attacks. The ongoing impact of bigotry in America is, perhaps, the quintessential “wicked problem.” A legacy of housing discrimination continues to shape neighborhoods—and how they are served by schools, police, and, yes, libraries—to this day. Studies continue to show implicit bias along lines of race and gender that impacts hiring, promotion, compensation, and retention—and explicit bias is still with us. All of these factors feed one another, eluding simple solutions to any that leave the others out of the equation.

Building Equity from the Ground Up | Diversity 2016

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The County of Los Angeles Public Library believes diverse programming begins with assembling a team of people from various backgrounds and cultures who can offer different perspectives, ideas, and out-of-the-box solutions that appeal to a wider swath of the population. Diverse teams are helping to guide the organization toward its goal of reducing barriers and increasing access to the ten million residents (3.5 million in its designated service area) of the County of Los Angeles, itself a diverse group: 26.6 percent white, 9.1 percent African American, 48.4 percent Latinx, and 15 percent Asian.

Q & A with Katrina M. Sanders | Diversity 2016

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Early in 2017, Adam Matthew, a database vendor known for its collections of digitized historical primary sources, will release a new collection called Race Relations. The database will offer access to a trove of previously undigitized civil rights material from the Race Relations Department of the United Church Board for Homeland Ministries, 1943–70, an organization that was based at Fisk University in Nashville and whose records are now housed at the Amistad Center at Tulane University in New Orleans. Chianta Dorsey, an archivist at the Amistad Center, explains, “The formal program of the department began in 1943 as a forum to engage in a national discussion regarding numerous topics including racial and ethnic relationships, economics, education, government policy, housing and employment.”