August 20, 2017

Branching Out, March 1, 2016

The new Canal Winchester Branch of the Columbus Metropolitan Library, OH, opened; the Richland Library, Columbia, SC, is about to embark on a major construction project; and more new construction and renovation news from the March 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

So Much More Than Info Tech | BackTalk

In his Wall Street Journal (WSJ) January 11 op-ed piece, “In Age of Google, Librarians Get Shelved,” public librarian Steve Barker writes, “The role for librarians and public libraries is shrinking” because of emerging information technologies. Five respondents disagreed in letters to the editor reprinted a week later by calling attention to librarians’ ability to ferret out “higher-level information” and their capacity “to readily decipher between the relevant and irrelevant information” that has been made possible by the profession’s “metamorphic shift to information science.” And American Library Association (ALA) president Sari Feldman justifiably concludes, “At a time of information overload and growing gaps between digital ‘haves’ and ‘have-nots,’ the roles for dynamic and engaged librarians are growing.”

Feedback: Letters to LJ, March 1, 2016 Issue

Looking for quiet places, neutrality at work, info lit for a lifetime, and more letters to editor from the March 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Faye LaCasse named Director of Product Marketing at EBSCO Information Services; Ellen Randolph promoted to Librarian II for Public Services, Boca Raton Public Library, FL; Günter Waibel appointed Associate Vice Provost and Executive Director of the University of California’s California Digital Library; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the March 1, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

The Librarian as Candidate | EveryLibrarian

At EveryLibrary, we know from nearly 50 library campaigns, as well as surveys of libraries nationwide, that the perception of librarians matters as much as the perception of the library itself in how voters act on Election Day.

A Great Place to Work: Where challenge and contribution converge | Editorial

Innovation Catalyst Librarian, Wikipedian in Residence, Director of Knowledge Curation and Innovation. These are just three of the job titles emerging in libraries that indicate the dynamism of the field. They point to libraries as a destination for talent seeking a great place to develop a career while making a contribution. Long misunderstood in the popular psyche as a haven of employment for those who just love to read, libraries are complex service organizations with opportunities to get paid to do good work for a lifetime. As they have evolved, so have the particular jobs available, and now is an exceptionally interesting time to think of the library as the place to dedicate the bulk of one’s waking hours. Along the way, libraries are looking more and more like the innovative employer every community should have humming at its core.

The Evolution of Library Work | Careers 2016

As this quartet of essays attest, from today’s groundbreaking titles to tomorrow’s essential skills, what it means to be a working librarian is expanding. This can drive changing job descriptions—sometimes a ticklish process to negotiate with unions but successful if embarked upon with a collaborative attitude. To get those new, improved positions, learn to navigate one of the trickiest aspects of the hunt: the group interview.

Top Skills for Tomorrow’s Librarians | Careers 2016

LJ reached out to academic and public library directors and other thought leaders nationwide to find out what new skills they expect to need in librarians in the next 20 years. The 11 listed below emerged as the essentials. Not complete departures, rather they build on trends already in evidence.

Five Brand-New Jobs for Today’s Librarians | Careers 2016

Roles for librarians in today’s public, academic, and special libraries keep shifting. The changes, however, aren’t always about technology, as these five new jobs demonstrate.

A Group Effort | Careers 2016

Most group interviews are really panel sessions—two or more interviewers meet with one candidate at a time. The other, scarier type of group interview is the multi­candidate interview. Two or more candidates gather in one room, and hiring managers expect them to make small talk, work in teams, and take turns answering questions.