September 22, 2017

News Briefs for May 15, 2016

Harvard University Press to join Columbia Sales Consortium, IMLS awards ARL a Laura Bush 21st Century Librarians Program grant, Library Technical Assistant certificate degree approved at Kaskaskia College, and more News in Brief from the May 15, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Tony Ageh joins New York Public Library as Chief Digital Officer; Simon J. Neame named Dean of Libraries, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Nicole Powell to join Every­Library; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the May 15, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, May 15, 2016 Issue

An NC welcome, UK volunteer power, floating away, and more letters to editor from the May 15, 2016 issue of Library Journal.

The First Year | College Readiness

Heather Moorefield-Lang has witnessed the face of freshman terror when the first-year students walk into the college library at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, are confronted by two million books, and don’t know where to start. As an assistant professor at the School of Library and Information Sciences, she knows that relieving that angst is her job.

Safety First | Library Security

The safety of staff and patrons is a top priority for all libraries, with managers striving to maintain a welcoming and secure environment for all who wish to make use of the space. Library systems nationwide enact security policies tailored to their respective communities and resources. Although these vary from library to library, librarians must strike a balance between offering a broad open door policy for all community members and ensuring a safe, secure environment for staff and patrons.

Steps to a Secure ­Library | Library Security

For a primer on managing disruptive patrons, knowing when to get law enforcement involved, and how to form the relationships that make that call easier, we spoke to Steve Albrecht. A retired police officer and security consultant, Albrecht is the author of Library Security: Better Communication, Safer ­Facilities (ALA Editions). (For more from Albrecht, see Playing It Safe: Author Steve Albrecht Tackles Security Measures for Libraries.)

Tracking Trouble | Library Security

Dealing with patrons who break library rules is no one’s favorite part of the job. But establishing clear policies and penalties, and a consistent system for tracking misbehavior, is the first step toward creating an environment in which staff feel confident when enforcing rules and patrons understand the consequences of misconduct.

Dream. Explore. Experiment. | Office Hours

Not bound by rules. Changing daily. Filled with life, sound, art, and inspiration. A vision of the public library woven with experience, involvement, empowerment, and a healthy dose of true innovation brought gasps of joy, a few tears, and much more to a standing room only crowd at the Public Library Association conference in Denver. The planning process and insights from the creation of Dokk1, the public library in Aarhus, Denmark, shared by Marie Østergård, project leader, Dokk1; Aarhus Public Libraries; and Pam Sandlian Smith, director, Anythink Libraries, Thornton, CO, can inform library planning of all types, shapes, and sizes and should be considered seriously by those of us teaching and developing LIS ­curricula.

Elevated by Art: A lofty vision in the community living room | Editorial

Paper Cloud is something to see, though it’s actually impossible to see it all at once. This “aerial sculpture” by George Peters and Melanie Walker has resonated with me since I saw it in 2014 during a tour of several facilities in the Salt Lake County Libraries (SLCL) system. The installation flies, floats, and wends its way through the West Jordan Library and the library’s Viridian Event Center, elevating the spaces and the people using them.

Cool Summer Reads: Hit the Beach with These Genre Fiction Favorites

Members of the American Library Association (ALA) RUSA-CODES Reading List Council, which annually presents its picks for the best in genre fiction, are pleased to share their top summer reads.