June 22, 2017

News Briefs for April 1, 2017

Associate Justice Antonin Scalia’s papers to go to Harvard Law School Library; IMLS issues National Leadership Grant to to help fund Mukurtu CMS; University of Texas (UT) Libraries launches Texas Data Repository; and more News in Brief from the April 1, 2017 issue of Library Journal.

Making Libraries Sing | Music Matters

Instead of focusing on a genre of music, or items to add to your collections, this column offers a shout-out to a librarian with a double life, and the work she and others do to bring music to patrons in a variety of ways.

Feedback: Letters to LJ, April 1, 2017 Issue

In search of open discourse, dreaming of drones, a thank-you note, and more letters to editor from the April 1, 2017 issue of Library Journal.

Information for Immigrants: Still Essential After All These Decades | Blatant Berry

Fears and hopes about immigrants and immigration have always been part of American society and politics. They have been manifest in many ways, some receptive and welcoming, others alarming and rejecting. While a host of obstacles, prejudices, and hostile forces are arrayed against immigrants, the public library is still one of the vital agencies making entry into our nation easier and more effective.

Library People News: Hires, Promotions, Retirements, and Obituaries

Grant Lynch hired as CAO, Columbus Metropolitan Library; Robert VanHees joins ProQuest as SVP and CFO; Deborah Wright appointed Director, Prince William County Public Library System, VA; and more new hires, promotions, retirements, and obituaries from the April 1, 2017 issue of Library Journal.

OPeri Publishing Platform | Field Reports

Some time ago, while I was working at a small state university, the library was approached by the English department, asking if we knew of some way of putting their biannual student journal online. This publication had been coming out periodically for approximately 15 years and contained essays, poetry, and short stories written by graduate and undergraduate students. Faculty occasionally assigned articles from it as required reading.

Disaster Recovery | Product Spotlight

The fire burned for days. Water—thousands of gallons of it—saturated the library’s materials, equipment, and interior. Smoke and water damage affected 250,000 bound volumes, two million pieces of micrographics, classified and confidential records, historical military documents, and a dedicated server room with more than 100 computer workstations. The Boeing 757 that had ripped through the Pentagon’s three outer rings on September 11, 2001, blasted open the doors to the Pentagon library sandwiched in the middle, the plane’s nose gear hitting the facility’s back wall. By the time staff were permitted to return, devastating moisture had taken over. Materials and equipment, personal belongings, catalog statistics, personnel files, and more were covered with mold and mildew.

Doing Fine(s)? | Fines & Fees

Fees and fines have traditionally been a fact of life for public libraries in America, even though a nonnegligible proportion of librarians and patrons have long considered fines at best an unpleasant hassle and at worst a serious barrier to access to resources for those unable to pay them. As many libraries continue to assess and overhaul their fine and fee structures, sponsored by Comprise Technologies, LJ surveyed a random selection of public librarians in January 2017 to learn about their libraries’ approaches to fines and fees. LJ received 454 responses.

Open Future | Library Systems Landscape 2017

Frustration about the cost of ILS and LSP systems and the limited number of options for the academic library market is understandable. In this year’s Library Systems Landscape feature, FOLIO argues for positive disruption of the status quo, but ongoing enhancements by vendors and established open source solutions present headwinds for any newcomer.

Wanting More (Survey) | Library Systems Landscape 2017

Academic librarians are concerned about the decreasing number of competitors in the integrated library system (ILS) and library services platform (LSP) market, and many are dissatisfied with their current ILS or LSP, according to the results of a recent LJ survey.