November 21, 2017

Chicago Public Library Gives Online Courses the Personal Touch

For over two years, Chicago Public Library (CPL) has brought free online courses to adult learners via its Learning Circles program, partnering with Peer 2 Peer University, a non-profit organization that facilitates learning outside of a brick-and-mortar classroom by cultivating high-quality, low-cost learning. The online program has helped over 225 participants complete classes since 2015, on topics ranging from personal finance to writing skills.

Ann Schoenenberger | Movers & Shakers 2017 – Digital Developers

Ann Schoenenberger knows the value of community and personal connections to the people of Kenton County, KY. Her partnerships with the local Maker community, web developers, and tech companies have helped almost 1,000 people learn new skills through STEAM-related (science, technology, engineering, art, mathematics) classes or groups on Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Python, and more that she organized at Kenton County Public Library (KCPL).

Flipped Classroom Tech Teaching | Field Reports

A few weeks ago, the Skokie Public Library (SPL) finished its four-week “Cracking the HTML Code: Build Your Own Website” program using a MOOC/flipped classroom mashup. Now in its fourth iteration, this class has had successes, failures, and everything in between. Needless to say, we’ve learned a lot about what works and what doesn’t.

Salwa Ismail | Movers & Shakers 2015 — Digital Developers

Soon after Salwa Ismail became the head of library information technology at Georgetown University (GU) in 2011, a network drive at the university library failed. She asked her team to stay late on a Friday night to replace it. “Things didn’t quite go as planned,” she admits. “Not only did we end up sleeping in the server room and eating in the closet next door to it, we spent the entire weekend up until 4 a.m. Monday morning fixing the issue.”

Public Libraries, U. Wisconsin–Madison Team Up on Climate Change MOOC

The University of Wisconsin–Madison (UWM) is offering a new four-week massive open online course (MOOC) on Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region. What’s different about this endeavor, besides the strong local interest angle, is that the university, in coordination with Wisconsin Library Services (WiLS), is partnering with 21 public libraries across the state. The collaborative venture will share scientific information about global warming via video, readings, an online discussion board, and quizzes, as well as in-person discussions at the libraries with scientists, staff, and graduate students from UWM, the National Weather Service, and the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.

NYPL and U. Penn Partner for In-Person MOOC Support

Poets through the ages have managed very well without institutional backing. The study of poetry, on the other hand, requires a little more infrastructure. This fall, the New York Public Library (NYPL) will team up with the University of Pennsylvania’s Kelly Writers House (KWH) to provide a physical space for participants in Professor Al Filreis’s […]

Taming a Wild Country | Peer to Peer Review

Looking back, the irony is so heavy-handed that it seems contrived. As my colleagues and I were preparing for our MOOC on Copyright for Educators and Librarians, which launched for the first time last week, the only resource that we wanted to use but could not successfully negotiate the permission for was Susan Bielstein’s book about negotiating permissions. It would have been great for us and, I am convinced, for the Press if we could have offered a single chapter of it for our over 8,000 MOOC participants to read. In the event, however, we rediscovered the fear and lack of sound business sense that grips the publishing industry, but also discovered the richness of the free resources that were available to us.

Flipping the LIS Classroom | Office Hours

In 2012, I wrote about the San Jose State University (SJSU) School of Library & Information Science’s (SLIS) evaluation of its core courses. We’re currently putting the finishing touches on a reimagined LIBR 200 class called “Information Communities.” While colleagues reworked other core courses, I’ve partnered with Debra Hansen, one of our senior faculty and a library historian, to create an evolving, modern course that presents students with our foundations as well as an overview of information users and the social, cultural, economic, technological, and political forces that shape their information access.

NYPL Partners with Coursera

In a move that will help a leading urban library system begin defining its role in the burgeoning field of massive open online courses (MOOCs), the New York Public Library (NYPL) on April 30 announced a partnership with MOOC provider Coursera. Beginning this summer, NYPL will support a selection of Coursera’s online courses by hosting weekly in-person discussion groups at several branches in the Bronx and Manhattan through Coursera’s Learning Hubs program. Neither organization is paying the other as part of the partnership, but NYPL officials note that sharing information regarding participation in these programs will benefit both parties.

Lessons from #hyperlibMOOC | Office Hours

With my co-instructor Kyle Jones, who is currently working toward his doctorate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s iSchool, I am mining the survey data from the Hyperlinked Library massive open online course (MOOC) that we taught last fall for 363 LIS professionals. With support from the San José State University School of Library and Information Science, feedback on the broad professional development opportunity we offered is providing some unique views of how models of online learning for library staff continue to evolve.