November 24, 2017

Reading Chicago Reading Wins Start-Up Grant

A new pilot study by DePaul University scholars in collaboration with the Chicago Public Library (CPL), has received one of 18 National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant awards. Reading Chicago Reading: Modeling Texts and Readers in a Public Library System plans to use data from One Book, One Chicago (OBOC), CPL’s robust 15-year-old community reading program—including circulation statistics, social media data, neighborhood demographics, and textual data—to analyze reading patterns for OBOC books and develop a predictive modeling tool to help drive CPL’s collection development and future OBOC choices.

National Endowment for the Humanities Honors “What Middletown Read”

On the 50th anniversary of the founding of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the agency recognized 50 of the top projects it has supported over the course of its history. Included on that list was What Middletown Read, a digital humanities project focused on Muncie, IN, that brought the patron, book, and circulation records of a turn-of-the-20th century public library into the 21st.

NEH’s Public Scholar Program: Scholarly Writing for a Popular Audience

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) will award $1.7 million in grants to 36 writers through its Public Scholar program, it announced on July 29. Open to authors of scholarly nonfiction, whether affiliated with an academic institution or writing independently, the Public Scholar program offers a $4,200 monthly stipend for periods from six months up to one year. Its ultimate goal, according to the NEH, is to “bring humanities scholarship beyond academic departments and university campuses and into book clubs and best-seller lists.”

NEH, Mellon Foundation’s Humanities Open Book Program to Revive Backlist Work

As part of a wider emphasis on digital publishing and the relevance of humanities scholarship, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) are giving new life to out-of-print humanities books. In January the two organizations announced a new joint pilot grant program, Humanities Open Book, which will help publishers identify important out-of-print works, secure rights to them, and convert them to EPUB format ebooks freely accessible under a Creative Commons (CC) license. Awards range from $50,000 to $100,000 per recipient, and will cover a period of one to three years.