October 16, 2017

Intellectual Freedom and Open Access | ALA Annual 2017

While intellectual freedom and open access (OA) are two ideals widely held and strongly advocated for across all disciplines of librarianship, each touches on different values. The panel “Intellectual Freedom and Open Access; Working Toward a Common Goal?” at the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference in Chicago, sponsored by ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Round Table, invited three librarians from different sectors to weigh in on where and how the two principles overlap, and how they can support each other.

Becoming an Open Library Leader | Leading from the Library

Librarians are leaders when they advocate for a culture of openness in their organizations and communities. Whether it’s open source, open access, or open educational resources, we support the principles of openness. What does open leadership look like?

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Making the Transition to Gold Open Access

The promise of Open Access is colored by concerns over financial models and their potential to disrupt established academic publishing. In this installment, we take a closer look at the issues surrounding the APC-supported Gold publishing model.

Who Pays the Freight? Open Access: The Future of Funding

In this webcast, our experts will highlight how librarians are tackling this important issue, and how the library can shape the future of funding Open Access.
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Life Is Like an Open Book | Open Access in Action

The Open Educational Resources (OER) phenomenon promises access to information with fewer barriers to academics, but the change will be disruptive. As Open Access has created turmoil among peer-reviewed journal publishers, OERs have similarly challenged curriculum. Learning content—from textbooks to course readings, assessment tools, and other material—was traditionally the domain of a few specialized publishers. However, with the advent (and dramatic proliferation) of digital content, traditional publishers have struggled to keep up.

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More Needles; Bigger Haystack | Open Access in Action

Open Access publishing has led to a proliferation of peer-reviewed articles. Librarians and researchers have a more challenging task when it comes to finding what they need. It has never been a simple task to locate relevant information. Entire disciplines of library science are devoted to the complicated task of indexing and retrieving published findings. However, under traditional models, that process was relatively predictable.

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Welcome to Science 2.0 | Open Access in Action

A look at the EU’s newly announced Open Science Policy Platform, and the long-term implications of Open Science for librarians and other information curators. In this series, we’ll be examining the implications of Open Access (or OA) publishing of peer reviewed journal content on academic and public libraries. OA is of course part of a larger phenomenon—the movement to make science itself accessible to everyone. Like OA, Open Science (OS) has broad implications for those charged with the curation of knowledge.

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Who Pays for Open Access?

The financial shift from subscribers to authors will have long term and potentially positive effects on peer-reviewed scientific and medical reporting.

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Libraries Support Data-Sharing Across the Research Lifecycle

As more and more researchers are committed to sharing their data, libraries are seizing the opportunity to demonstrate their value across the research lifecycle and support open culture. Mandates from funding agencies have made data management and sharing a high priority for researchers; new strategies for reuse and visualization are shining a spotlight on the importance of discoverability. Libraries have an important role to play in research data management and sharing; they are taking the opportunity to remind their partners across campus that managing research data, like most efforts in scholarly communication, is a team sport.

Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) Releases “Strategy and Workplan 2016-2018″ Document

From the COAR Strategic Directions 2016-2018 Plan: To realize our mission and achieve this vision, COAR will focus on community, leadership and engagement at the international level. Four strategic directions will guide COAR’s activities: Promote the development of a sustainable, global network of open access repositories as key elements of international research infrastructures in support […]