April 27, 2016

Life Is Like an Open Book | Open Access in Action

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The Open Educational Resources (OER) phenomenon promises access to information with fewer barriers to academics, but the change will be disruptive. As Open Access has created turmoil among peer-reviewed journal publishers, OERs have similarly challenged curriculum. Learning content—from textbooks to course readings, assessment tools, and other material—was traditionally the domain of a few specialized publishers. […]

More Needles; Bigger Haystack | Open Access in Action

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Open Access publishing has led to a proliferation of peer-reviewed articles. Librarians and researchers have a more challenging task when it comes to finding what they need. It has never been a simple task to locate relevant information. Entire disciplines of library science are devoted to the complicated task of indexing and retrieving published findings. However, under traditional models, that process was relatively predictable.

Welcome to Science 2.0 | Open Access in Action

Figure 1: Adapted, with permission, from Dr. Burgelman’s 2015 presentation.

A look at the EU’s newly announced Open Science Policy Platform, and the long-term implications of Open Science for librarians and other information curators. In this series, we’ll be examining the implications of Open Access (or OA) publishing of peer reviewed journal content on academic and public libraries. OA is of course part of a larger phenomenon—the movement to make science itself accessible to everyone. Like OA, Open Science (OS) has broad implications for those charged with the curation of knowledge.

Who Pays for Open Access?

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The financial shift from subscribers to authors will have long term and potentially positive effects on peer-reviewed scientific and medical reporting.

Libraries Support Data-Sharing Across the Research Lifecycle

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As more and more researchers are committed to sharing their data, libraries are seizing the opportunity to demonstrate their value across the research lifecycle and support open culture. Mandates from funding agencies have made data management and sharing a high priority for researchers; new strategies for reuse and visualization are shining a spotlight on the importance of discoverability. Libraries have an important role to play in research data management and sharing; they are taking the opportunity to remind their partners across campus that managing research data, like most efforts in scholarly communication, is a team sport.

Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) Releases “Strategy and Workplan 2016-2018″ Document

From the COAR Strategic Directions 2016-2018 Plan: To realize our mission and achieve this vision, COAR will focus on community, leadership and engagement at the international level. Four strategic directions will guide COAR’s activities: Promote the development of a sustainable, global network of open access repositories as key elements of international research infrastructures in support […]

New Research Article: “Library Support For Open Access Journal Publishing: A Needs Analysis”

The following article is found in the latest issue of UKSG Insights. Title Library support for open access journal publishing: a needs analysis Author Alice Keller Zentralbibliothek, Switzerland Source UKSG Insights Vol 28 No 3 (November 2015) Abstract The aim of this study was to establish the role of academic libraries in the context of […]

An Interview with Peter Suber on Open Access | Not Dead Yet

Cheryl LaGuardia

Cheryl LaGuardia interviews open-access expert Peter Suber.

FASTR Approved by Senate Committee

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On July 29 the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee (HSGAC) unanimously passed S. 779, the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research (FASTR) Act by voice vote. The bill, which calls for public access to taxpayer-funded research, was marked up to bring it into line with the existing White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) policy memorandum and current National institutes of Health (NIH) policy, and will now move to the full Senate for consideration.

Sharing Policy Draws Criticism; Elsevier Responds

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On April 30 the academic publishing company Elsevier announced that it would be updating its article sharing policies. In a post on its website titled Unleashing the power of academic sharing, Elsevier’s director of access and policy Alicia Wise outlined a framework of new sharing and hosting policies, which include guidelines for sharing academic articles at every stage of their existence, from preprint to post-publication, and protocol for both non-commercial—that is, repository—and commercial hosting platforms.