November 16, 2017

Measure the Future Enters Next Phase

Measure the Future, an open source, open hardware project that enables libraries to collect and analyze data regarding how their physical space is being used, will soon deploy new sensors at libraries participating in its public beta launch, including the Meridian Library District (MLD), ID; the State University of New York, Potsdam; the New York Public Library; the University of Boston Law Library; and the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.

Darien Library Launches SOPAC3 Catalog, Website

Connecticut’s Darien Library on June 1 debuted its new online catalog system, SOPAC3, along with a mobile-friendly responsive design website that integrates seamlessly with the new catalog. Features include linked accounts, allowing parents to see what their children have checked out without a separate login, patron control over checkout histories and “wish lists” of items from the catalog stored with their profile, the ability to register and RSVP for library events from their profile screen, and full integration with the Envisionware eCommerce system used by Darien. Eventually, the library plans to release the source code for the entire suite, making it available for free to other interested libraries.

LYRASIS, DuraSpace Leaders Discuss Dissolved Merger

On May 16, the boards of LYRASIS and DuraSpace dissolved a planned merger that had been announced on January 27. But executives from the not-for-profit library software and service providers told LJ that four months of formal due diligence and analysis had helped members and leadership from both organizations become more familiar with one another, setting the stage for future collaboration.

Koha Klassmates Adopted by 20 Library Schools

Twenty library and information science programs, including the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Washington, Rutgers University, Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), and the University of Pittsburgh, have begun using free hosted instances of the Koha open-source integrated library system (ILS) as an instructional resource via the Koha Klassmates program launched by ByWater Solutions last fall.

Open Source Picks Up the Pace | Library Systems Landscape 2015

Koha and Evergreen aim high with development targets. This February, EBSCO Information Services announced plans to provide funding and technical assistance for contributors to the Koha open source ILS platform. The partnership will enable an upgrade of Koha’s core search engine to Elasticsearch, the popular open source, multitenant-capable full-text search engine.

Newport News PL Launches Open Source Usage Software

Virginia’s Newport News Public Library System (NNPLS) launched StatBase, an open-source usage statistics program that enables libraries to track and visualize data on circulation, patron registration, door counts, reference, acquisitions, instructor-led courses, and more. The application is available as a free download on SourceForge.

Open Source Options | Library Systems Landscape

Led by Koha and Evergreen, open source ILS solutions continued to demonstrate steady growth in 2013. These systems appeal to libraries for a variety of reasons. Unlike commercial ILS products, open source code can be accessed and altered by anyone with the expertise, enabling libraries to conduct or outsource priority development work on their own schedule, rather than wait for their requests to wend their way through a vendor’s queue.

Developing Partnerships

Regularly ranked as the busiest or the second busiest library in the United States, the King County Library System (KCLS) in Washington annually processes 22 million checkouts and records more than 84 million visits to its catalog. It’s enough to strain any integrated library system (ILS), and a few years ago, IT services director Jed Moffitt decided that, owing to this volume and the need to add proprietary features to its system, there simply wasn’t a commercial ILS on the market that could meet the library’s unique requirements. He famously coauthored an Institute of Museum and Library Services grant of $1 million that enabled KCLS to experiment with, and then migrate to, the open source Evergreen ILS while developing a peer-to-peer support model to help other libraries and consortia that were interested in doing the same. Moffitt admits that there have been growing pains during the past three years. But he still maintains that commercial ILS vendors simply aren’t organized to do the type of development work that KCLS needs.