August 31, 2014

Should “Tweeps” Be in the Dictionary?

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Tuesday June 18, 2013, 2:00-3:00 PM ET How does social media impact on our view of dictionaries and the development of the English language? In this webcast, a dictionary editor, a reviewer from Library Journal, and a linguist, lexicographer, and language columnist come together to discuss and debate the topic This archive is no longer available

Coursera, Publisher Pilot Offers Licensed Content to MOOC Students

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aBeginning May 8, instructors providing Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) via Coursera will have the option to supplement their video lectures with content from major academic publishers Cengage Learning, Macmillan Higher Education, Oxford University Press, SAGE Publications,and Wiley, at no cost to their students. And that’s just the beginning: “Coursera is also actively discussing pilot agreements and related alliances with Springer and additional publishers,” the company said in a statement. This could be a sea change for both MOOCs and publishers’ business models.

Changing the DNA of Scholarly Publishing: The Impact of Born Digital Content on the Scholarly Community Today

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Wednesday, February 6, 2013, 2:00-3:00 PM ET After 500 years of print publishing, the advent of digitization has caused a huge evolutionary leap in scholarly publishing. Content once logically packaged in a book or print journal issue has now quickly evolved not just to an online version of print but into an entirely new digitally-born method of scholarly communication. In this webcast, publishers and librarians will discuss current emerging models for scholarly communication and discuss its future. This archive is no longer available

Plaintiffs Must Pay Almost $3 Million in GSU Legal Fees

On September 30 Judge Evans, who had already said the publisher plaintiffs in the Georgia State University (GSU) ereserves case would have to pay the university’s court costs, has now put a number on that obligation: just shy of $3 million. That’s $2,861,348.71 in attorney’s fees and $85,746.39 in costs.

GSU Injunction Rejected; Plaintiffs Must Pay Legal Fees

On August 10, Judge Orinda Evans rejected the “more narrowly tailored injunction” proposed by the plaintiffs in the Georgia State University (GSU) ereserves case. Earlier this year, Evans found five cases of infringing behavior on GSU’s part; the other seventy instances considered were either dismissed on technical grounds or held to be fair use. Evans […]

Georgia State Copyright Case: What You Need To Know—and What It Means for E-Reserves

One of the most closely watched e-reserve cases in recent memory came to an end—though an appeal is still possible—on May 11, when Judge Orinda Evans of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia ruled in Cambridge University Press (CUP); Oxford University Press (OUP); Sage Publications v. Georgia State University (GSU). The case alleged copyright infringement in GSU’s e-reserves, and in essence the judge came down on the side of libraries in a 350-page decision delivered almost a year after she heard closing arguments.

Authority, Connectivity, and Discovery: The Evolving Role of Reference in the Wiki Age

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Thursday, June 14, 2012, 2:00-3:00 PM ET Why are traditionally-published reference resources still necessary? What are publishers doing to make them accessible, usable, and discoverable in the library and on the free Web? How are these changes impacting reference’s presence in the library? How are user habits affecting how reference is published, developed, and utilized? Register now to hear our esteemed panel, including Oxford University Press’ Robert Faber, Editorial Director for Reference (UK), Dave Tyckoson, reference librarian and Associate Dean at California State University, Fresno, and Dinah Birch, Professor of English Literature and Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research and Knowledge Exchange at the University of Liverpool and Editor of the newest edition of the classic Oxford Companion to English Literature, 7th Edition, on a panel moderated by Library Journal and School Library Journal Reference Editor Etta Thornton, as they tackle the topic of the ever-changing role of, and need for, authoritative reference in today’s libraries in the “Wiki age.”The archive is no longer available.

Reaching the Wikipedia Generation: Reference Roundtable Tackles Trends and Thorny Issues

On January 21, 2012, at the American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting in Dallas, LJ met with reference publishers, database aggregators, and public and academic reference librarians to discuss recent events and issues in the library world. It had been an exciting week. In protest against the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect [...]

Reaching the Wikipedia Generation: Reference Roundtable Tackles Trends and Thorny Issues

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On January 21, 2012, at the American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting in Dallas, LJ met with reference publishers, database aggregators, and public and academic reference librarians to discuss recent events and issues in the library world. It had been an exciting week. In protest against the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA), which would have effectively forced online sites to police user-generated content, online reference giant Wikipedia had “gone dark” for a day.

The blackout was fresh in everyone’s mind and inspired some soul-searching about overreliance on this resource by patrons and librarians alike. But the group covered lots of other topics, too, from debates over patron-driven acquisition (PDA) and how to get reluctant students and faculty into academic libraries, to innovative ways to measure usage and get marketing help from vendors. The following comments are highlights of the conversation.