September 30, 2014

Most GVRL Partners Expected to Adopt Usage-Driven Acquisition Model

Most GVRL Partners Expected to Adopt Usage-Driven Acquisition Model

Gale hopes to have all of its more than 80 publisher partners participating in Gale Virtual Reference Library’s (GVRL) new Usage-Driven Acquisition (UDA) model by Spring 2014, according to company officials.

OCLC WorldCat Knowledge Base Supports Demand Driven Acquisition

OCLC WorldCat Knowledge Base Supports Demand Driven Acquisition

OCLC has begun supporting demand-driven acquisition (DDA) through the WorldCat Knowledge Base. DDA pioneer and ProQuest subsidiary EBL will be the first ebook service to provide data, with sister company ebrary to follow soon. Interest in DDA is well established, but there are still challenges facing adopters of these programs.

Q&A: Scott Wasinger, EBSCO Publishing’s VP of Sales, Ebooks and Audiobooks

Q&A: Scott Wasinger, EBSCO Publishing’s VP of Sales, Ebooks and Audiobooks

Scott Wasinger, EBSCO Publishing’s VP of Sales, Ebooks and Audiobooks, discusses EBSCO’s new Collection Manager tool, new options for patron driven acquisition, and plans to expand the company’s fiction and audiobook offerings in 2013, as part of a series of Q&As leading up to “The Digital Shift: Libraries, Ebooks and Beyond,” LJ’s third annual ebook summit on Wednesday, October 17.

Reaching the Wikipedia Generation: Reference Roundtable Tackles Trends and Thorny Issues

On January 21, 2012, at the American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting in Dallas, LJ met with reference publishers, database aggregators, and public and academic reference librarians to discuss recent events and issues in the library world. It had been an exciting week. In protest against the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect [...]

Reaching the Wikipedia Generation: Reference Roundtable Tackles Trends and Thorny Issues

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On January 21, 2012, at the American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting in Dallas, LJ met with reference publishers, database aggregators, and public and academic reference librarians to discuss recent events and issues in the library world. It had been an exciting week. In protest against the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA), which would have effectively forced online sites to police user-generated content, online reference giant Wikipedia had “gone dark” for a day.

The blackout was fresh in everyone’s mind and inspired some soul-searching about overreliance on this resource by patrons and librarians alike. But the group covered lots of other topics, too, from debates over patron-driven acquisition (PDA) and how to get reluctant students and faculty into academic libraries, to innovative ways to measure usage and get marketing help from vendors. The following comments are highlights of the conversation.