July 24, 2014

OCLC WorldCat Knowledge Base Supports Demand Driven Acquisition

OCLC WorldCat Knowledge Base Supports Demand Driven Acquisition

OCLC has begun supporting demand-driven acquisition (DDA) through the WorldCat Knowledge Base. DDA pioneer and ProQuest subsidiary EBL will be the first ebook service to provide data, with sister company ebrary to follow soon. Interest in DDA is well established, but there are still challenges facing adopters of these programs.

EBL Touts Its Versatility | Series: Exploring Ebook Options

EBL Touts Its Versatility | Series: Exploring Ebook Options

Ebook Library (EBL), the library ebook platform launched in 2004 by Australian company Ebooks Corporation, has had worldwide success. More than 600 institutions, encompassing thousands of libraries, around the world now use EBL.

The majority, 81 percent, are academic libraries, with another 15 percent of the client base made up of special, government, and corporate libraries; the remaining four percent are split between public and school libraries. Higher education institutions large and small, including three LJ will look at more closely—the University of Texas (UT) at Austin; Wellesley College, MA, one of the famed “Seven Sisters” schools; and Fairfield University, CT—are among EBL’s many clients.

Two Consortial Ebook Projects Move Deeper Into Demand-Driven Acquisitions

On May 25, nine libraries from the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries launched a data-driven acquisitions ebook pilot program. The project is similar to the one being run by the Orbis Cascade Alliance, which recently received FY13 funding of $750,000.

Reaching the Wikipedia Generation: Reference Roundtable Tackles Trends and Thorny Issues

On January 21, 2012, at the American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting in Dallas, LJ met with reference publishers, database aggregators, and public and academic reference librarians to discuss recent events and issues in the library world. It had been an exciting week. In protest against the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect [...]

Reaching the Wikipedia Generation: Reference Roundtable Tackles Trends and Thorny Issues

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On January 21, 2012, at the American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting in Dallas, LJ met with reference publishers, database aggregators, and public and academic reference librarians to discuss recent events and issues in the library world. It had been an exciting week. In protest against the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA), which would have effectively forced online sites to police user-generated content, online reference giant Wikipedia had “gone dark” for a day.

The blackout was fresh in everyone’s mind and inspired some soul-searching about overreliance on this resource by patrons and librarians alike. But the group covered lots of other topics, too, from debates over patron-driven acquisition (PDA) and how to get reluctant students and faculty into academic libraries, to innovative ways to measure usage and get marketing help from vendors. The following comments are highlights of the conversation.

ALA Midwinter 2012: Collection Development Officers Ponder Ebooks in Research Libraries

Pricing, content, and terms are primary concerns, according to one segment of a wide-ranging discussion Saturday morning at the ALA Midwinter meeting.