May 23, 2017

Leading Adults to YA Fiction | Readers’ Advisory

According to a 2012 Bowker study, “Understanding the Children’s Book Consumer in the Digital Age,” the majority of YA buyers, at 55 percent, are adult—and of those, 78 percent are buying for themselves.

Learning To Love Romance | Readers’ Advisory

Passionate historicals, fast-paced suspense, werewolves, Vikings, modern-day bikers, Navy SEALs, Amish families. The romance genre can give you all these things and a happy ending.

Making Horror Less Scary | Readers’ Advisory

Welcome to the world of horror fiction, where monsters roam the streets, vampires attack at night, ghosts haunt every home, and mayhem is the norm.

Expanding the SF/Fantasy Universe | Readers’ Advisory

Among librarians, both science fiction (sf) and fantasy can create feelings of fear and uncertainty about our ability to serve our readers’ needs. But that needn’t be the case: here are some ways to become more comfortable with sf and fantasy and better at connecting patrons with the genre.

RA Ready: A Beginner’s Guide to Genre Fiction | Readers’ Advisory

There are few things more satisfying for a librarian than uniting a reader with a great book (or two or ten). But many library staffers experience anxiety when asked to recommend titles in genres they don’t read themselves and with which they are unfamiliar.

Sarah Bean Thompson | Movers & Shakers 2017 – Advocates

“Sarah Bean Thompson is a readers’ advisory [RA] rock star!” raves Jessie East, branch manager of the Library Center of the Springfield–Greene County Library District. “She has an infectious passion and incredible talent for RA, [and] every program she does leads attendees right back to books, whether it’s a mock awards session for families and educators or a Geeky Storytime for preschoolers and their caregivers.”

What To Read (and Watch) After “1984”

Fiction, both classic and contemporary; nonfiction; and film and TV for readers who have finished George Orwell’s 1984 and still hunger for more titles to give them perspective on the current social and political climate.

The Case for Informed Browsing | BackTalk

Netflix knows something that libraries haven’t figured out yet: how to create categories that help people browse online in an informed yet serendipitous way.

Stephanie Anderson | Movers & Shakers 2016 – Advocates

Indie bookseller–turned–librarian Stephanie Anderson passionately believes that librarians should be able to give solid book recommendations whether they are fans of a given genre or not. As assistant director for public services at Darien Library, CT, she has been on the forefront of creative ways to help patrons decide what to read, from displaying a trending book on the holds shelf that might entice patrons to starting a service called “You Are What You Read Next,” allowing people to receive personalized recommendations after completing a survey. Anderson also spearheaded a business book club for nonfiction lovers that doubles as an unofficial networking meeting.

Mind the RA Gap | BackTalk

The inconsistent treatment of readers’ advisory (RA) as a core service for adults in public libraries has led to inconsistent demand for quality RA education, which has further led to inconsistent service. Jennie Maas Flexner noted as far back as 1934 that the “need for specialized education is as evident in [readers’ advisory] work as in every other department of the library.” This is still true, and the need is still not being met. Two gaps prevent RA from being taught in a way that would make it the core public library service it should be.