October 20, 2014

Mission Bell Media Moves Ahead with Mission | PubCrawl

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Mission Bell Media (MBM), a new publisher with a laser-like focus on leadership, took one step further into the public eye, debuting its official website on April 22. MBM is the brainchild of veteran academic publisher Rolf Janke, who founded SAGE Reference, an imprint of SAGE Publications, in 2001 and led it from three titles to nearly 300 over the course of a dozen years. Mission Bell Media combines Janke’s two passions: his own longtime study of what creates compelling leaders and his 30-plus years in academic publishing, which, he said, gave him a unique perspective on librarians leading change in academic libraries and paving the way for the next generation.

Coursera, Publisher Pilot Offers Licensed Content to MOOC Students

Chegg textbook for Coursera

aBeginning May 8, instructors providing Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) via Coursera will have the option to supplement their video lectures with content from major academic publishers Cengage Learning, Macmillan Higher Education, Oxford University Press, SAGE Publications,and Wiley, at no cost to their students. And that’s just the beginning: “Coursera is also actively discussing pilot agreements and related alliances with Springer and additional publishers,” the company said in a statement. This could be a sea change for both MOOCs and publishers’ business models.

SAGE Acquires Adam Matthew

SAGE Acquires Adam Matthew

Adam Matthew, a company that’s known for providing specialized online primary-source collections, announced today that it’s been bought by SAGE, a social science reference publisher.

Plaintiffs Must Pay Almost $3 Million in GSU Legal Fees

On September 30 Judge Evans, who had already said the publisher plaintiffs in the Georgia State University (GSU) ereserves case would have to pay the university’s court costs, has now put a number on that obligation: just shy of $3 million. That’s $2,861,348.71 in attorney’s fees and $85,746.39 in costs.

GSU Ereserves Plaintiffs Propose Injunction

The plaintiffs in the Georgia State University (GSU) ereserves case—Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, and Sage Publications—made one last attempt at getting the broader injunction they originally proposed before the trial but, realistically, offered as an alternative “a more narrowly tailored injunction” that more or less hews to the reasoning the court displayed in […]

Does It Pay To Sue Libraries? | Peer to Peer Review

Ever since the Georgia State e-reserves copyright lawsuit was filed in April 2008, the academic library (and faculty who were aware of it) community has been waiting to find out how Judge Orinda Evans would view the provision of digital course readings under fair use.  Now we know, based on her May 11 ruling, that […]

Reaching the Wikipedia Generation: Reference Roundtable Tackles Trends and Thorny Issues

On January 21, 2012, at the American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting in Dallas, LJ met with reference publishers, database aggregators, and public and academic reference librarians to discuss recent events and issues in the library world. It had been an exciting week. In protest against the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect [...]

Reaching the Wikipedia Generation: Reference Roundtable Tackles Trends and Thorny Issues

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On January 21, 2012, at the American Library Association (ALA) Midwinter Meeting in Dallas, LJ met with reference publishers, database aggregators, and public and academic reference librarians to discuss recent events and issues in the library world. It had been an exciting week. In protest against the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA), which would have effectively forced online sites to police user-generated content, online reference giant Wikipedia had “gone dark” for a day.

The blackout was fresh in everyone’s mind and inspired some soul-searching about overreliance on this resource by patrons and librarians alike. But the group covered lots of other topics, too, from debates over patron-driven acquisition (PDA) and how to get reluctant students and faculty into academic libraries, to innovative ways to measure usage and get marketing help from vendors. The following comments are highlights of the conversation.