November 18, 2017

Why Internet Searches Are Not Enough | Peer to Peer Review

Historians are used to sleuthing. Obtaining verifiable sources is difficult; original documents may be unavailable. With computer searching methods some of the detective work has eased up, at least superficially. However search engines depend on databases that can be parsed and queried digitally. Whatever is not in these databases is unreachable except in person. Great strides have been made thanks to the Internet, and online techniques are useful tools, but their help is always limited.

The search for Rodríguez’s “Chinese Poem” is a case study in how, despite strong efforts and advanced technological approaches, searches cannot be guaranteed to succeed.

Working With Librarians to Make Search Human Again | From the Bell Tower

Internet search engines seem to be working well enough. There are plenty of choices. So why would an entrepreneur think people will want yet another one? This one has a twist. Librarians.

Employers Want Workplace-Ready Grads, but Can Higher Ed Deliver? | From the Bell Tower

A new survey reveals a wide gap between provosts and business leaders when it comes to judging college students’ readiness for the workplace. What can academic librarians take away from the controversy?

How Much Would You Pay to Search for the Royal Wedding Guest List?

What would users pay per search to get at the wealth of web data to which they’ve become accustomed? What’s the reasonable search price on “the royal wedding guest list”? Kevin Kelly highlights some interesting research into relative search measures and merits, research that also points to some interesting questions about how to measure the value of library materials, discovery services, and even library services more broadly.