March 22, 2017

Write Here | Programming

THE WRITE STUFF (Clockwise from top l.): Denver PL’s Hard Times Writing Workshop; SpeakEasy Book Authors Signing for the Community Novel Project at Topeka & Shawnee County PL, KS; Corvallis–Benton County PL, OR, National Novel Writing Month plot planning party; 
White Plains PL, NY, Families of Veterans Writing Workshop (FVWW) participants (l.–r.) Ekaterina Quinones, Julie Geisler, Amanda Cerreto, 
and Kareem Brown; (inset) FVWW book cover

Everyone has a book in them, it’s said. While Christopher Hitchens completed that phrase with “in most cases that’s where it should stay,” it doesn’t seem the public agrees. This is dramatically demonstrated by the expansion of U.S. publishing, as measured by Bowker, the U.S. issuer of ISBNs, the numbers that help track book sales. In 2002, Bowker issued 247,777. In 2012 (the most recent figures available), demand rose to 2,352,797—an increase of 2,105,020, or a whopping 849.5 percent.

Engaging Your Local Writing Community

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Join LJ Reviews editor Henrietta Verma for an insightful free webcast that will focus on successful programming ideas for engaging the authors, published and aspiring, in your local community. Hearing about projects from Topeka & Shawnee County’s Community Novel Project to Cuyahoga County’s “Indie Ohio” collection of self-published ebooks, you’ll learn how public libraries are engaging with their local authors to provide unique services that draw in local readers and authors and help uncover the best of local creativity.
Archive is now available!

BlueInk Review—Patti and Patty | Self-Publishing and Libraries

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This month, I visit with one of the first organizations to tackle one of the fundamental librarian concerns about self-publishing: quality.

Jukepop: Back to the Future | Self Publishing and Libraries

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Serialized writing has a long history, and can be hugely popular. It is said that American fans of Charles Dickens, eager to get the latest chapter of “The Old Curiosity Shop,” lined up at the docks of New York, shouting out to the crew of a ship that had not yet come to port, “Is little Nell dead?”

Author, Author! | Programs That Pop

BOOKS IN BLOOM Sachem PL’s garden was “home” to dozens of local authors, such as Ralph T. Gazzillo (l.) and Leeann Lavin (r.)

With the recent explosion of self-publishing and the relative ease with which one can become a published author, our library has been bombarded with requests by writers looking for us to host author talks and book events. The sad truth is, with rare exceptions, author visits can be a hard sell, requiring herculean PR efforts, even for established authors with respectable sales. Given the limited amount of program space at the library and the large number of high-demand programs, I can’t schedule events for every author who pitches me.

Christian Publishing Initiatives Expand | PubCrawl

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HarperCollins Christian Publishing (established when HarperCollins, longtime parent company of Zondervan, acquired competitor Thomas Nelson in 2012) is moving more strongly into the library market. Earlier this year, the company appointed Tracy Danz, a Zondervan veteran and former publisher of general trade nonfiction, to the newly created position of director, library sales and marketing. “We’re putting a focus on libraries we didn’t have before,” Danz told LJ.

Self-Publishing Skyrockets | PubCrawl

Francine Fialkoff

According to a new analysis released in October by ProQuest affiliate Bowker, the ISBN agency, self-publishing continued its growth spurt, up 59 percent in 2012 over 2011, from 246,912 titles to 391,768. The gains were even more startling over the longer period for which Bowker collected data: a 422 percent rise since 2007.

What’s the Problem with Self-Publishing?

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The discussion of self-published titles in libraries has increased in recent years, in direct proportion to the angst surrounding ongoing ebook licensing negotiations with major traditional publishers. Prompted by the prospect of limited availability of popular titles or higher prices—probably both—­librarians are understandably weighing alternatives that might satisfy readership demands. There are, however, very real barriers that must be overcome before self-publishing is likely to be even a small component of many collection efforts. Some barriers will fall away naturally as this growing market gains momentum and filters its way into downstream publishing markets like libraries, while others will require a more concerted advocacy effort to overcome.

Auto-Graphics Adds Self-Publishing Tool to Library Software

Self-publishing via libraries is a hot topic these days. Califa is partnering with Smashwords to allow order cialis overnight its patrons to self-publish. A few public libraries have brought in Espresso Book Machines and seen the demand for self-publishing dwarf print-on-demand. Jamie LaRue and David Weinberger call on libraries to be a platform for self-published […]

Penguin Parent Buys iUniverse Owner

Pearson, parent company of Big Six publishing company Penguin, acquired self-publishing company Author Solutions Inc. (ASI) from private equity firm Bertram Capital for $116 million in cash. The five year old company is better known by its brand names iUniverse and Xlibris, under which it has published about 190,000 print and electronic books so far by about 150,000 authors. The company has grown at approximately 12 percent for the past three years; in 2011, it made about $100 million in revenues.