November 17, 2017

Tests Are Changing: How to Keep Your Collections Up to Date

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT
Join us as Rosanne Cordell, Lauren Barack, and Barron’s publisher, Bob O’Sullivan, share insights and tips on ensuring your test-prep collections are up-to-date.
Register Now!

Standards, Frameworks, and the Work We Need To Do | Peer to Peer Review

The great debate has come to a truce: The new Framework for Information Literacy has been adopted, but will not replace the familiar information literacy Standards, at least for now. This probably frustrates people who strongly support (or oppose) one or the other, but it gives us a chance to work out some sticky issues without anyone feeling that they lost.

Opinion: Rethinking How We Rate and Rank MLIS Programs | LIS Education

Throughout the United States and Canada, there are more than 63 ALA-accredited programs offering advanced degrees in library and information science. While the number of programs has grown over the years, the field has yet to develop any significant, rigorous measures of evaluation to assess them. Even as interest in LIS education grows, the tools for determining which programs will match a student’s goals or establishing a hierarchy of quality remain stuck in neutral.

ALA Accountability and Accreditation of LIS Programs | Backtalk

Michael Kelley’s April 29, 2013 editorial “Can We Talk about the MLS?” and the 157 comments posted to that article so far prompted us to consider accountability for the American Library Association’s (ALA) accreditation of graduate programs in library and information science. The ALA Standards emphasize what programs must accomplish in terms of strategic planning and student learning outcomes. ALA does not dictate what those outcomes should be nor does it specify any particular courses that must be offered in an MLIS program. So, what does it mean to be a graduate of an ALA accredited program?