January 20, 2018

Technology

Major CPU Security Flaw: What Libraries Need to Know

Intel Corporation this week acknowledged two serious, processor-level security vulnerabilities—named “Meltdown” and “Spectre”—that affect virtually all computers manufactured during the past decade that contain the company’s market- leading CPUs. Processors manufactured by ARM and AMD may also be affected by Spectre, reportedly the more difficult flaw to exploit.

EBSCO and BiblioLabs Announce OA Service for Theses, Dissertations

EBSCO Information Services and BiblioLabs will launch OpenDissertations.org, an open access initiative that will facilitate the discovery of electronic theses and dissertations beginning early this year.

Miami University Library Hosts Esports Arena

The King Library at Miami University (MU), OH, recently debuted a state-of-the-art esports arena prominently located on the library’s first floor. Developed in partnership with the university’s Armstrong Institute for Interactive Media Studies (AIMS) and IT services department, the new facility is home to the Miami Redhawks esports program, which attained varsity status in 2016.

Mixed Reality | Product Spotlight

With the recent introduction of iOS 11’s ARKit, Apple’s software development kit for creating AR apps, patrons will likely see a variety of new apps that will combine the virtual with the actual in useful and innovative ways. In this spotlight, we take a look at ARKit as well as some AR and VR (virtual reality) apps and services currently on the scene.

Creating Creative Spaces | Field Reports

There was a clear need for collaborative and creative community spaces in the branches of Ontario’s Hamilton Public Library (HPL). We had two objectives: provide customers with the services and technology they couldn’t easily access at home and support the city’s growing arts and innovation community.

FCC Kills Net Neutrality, Fight Likely to Move to Courts

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) today passed the “Restoring Internet Freedom Order” (RIFO), overturning the 2015 Open Internet Order, a regulatory framework established during the Obama administration that gave the FCC the power to enforce “net neutrality,” defining broadband Internet as a utility similar to electricity or water, and requiring Internet Service Providers (ISPs), such as Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T, to treat all data traffic on the Internet equally.

ITHAKA Next Wave Conference Focuses on Higher Ed Challenges

Speakers at ITHAKA’s The Next Wave conference, held at New York’s Roosevelt Hotel on November 29, made the case for work that colleges and universities must take on if they want to improve national educational attainment. The conference, “Innovating and Adapting to Address Today’s Higher Education Challenges,” looked at new approaches from a variety of angles, from administration to the classroom to research, with alignment between leadership and the library given particular attention.

SJSU-Led Team Explores Blockchain in Libraries

A group led by San Jose State University iSchool (SJSU) Director Sandra Hirsh and SJSU lecturer Susan Alman is exploring how the library field could use blockchain, the open source, secure distributed database system originally developed to validate and record Bitcoin cryptocurrency transactions. Funded with a recent $100,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), SJSU is planning an online Library 2.0 conference on the topic on June 7, 2018, and a Blockchain National Forum in mid-2018.

Library of Congress Encourages Public to Engage with Digital Resources via labs.loc.gov

The Library of Congress (LC) recently launched labs.loc.gov, a new online space that facilitates creative use of the Library’s digital collections.

Adam Matthew Enables Full-Text Search of Handwritten Manuscripts

Adam Matthew Digital last month announced the launch of Handwritten Text Recognition, an artificial intelligence technology that enables full-text searching of digitized, handwritten manuscript collections.