March 23, 2018

A Job By Any Other Name | LJ’s Placements & Salaries Survey 2012

“Challenges have been plentiful!” was the common refrain across the 2011 graduating class. As the general economy continues its slow climb out of recession, this past year offered ongoing unemployment and stiff competition for jobs, especially for school library media specialists and reference librarians. However, despite erroneous media reports that library and information science (LIS) is a dying field, there were numerous bright spots and unprecedented gains, ranging from positive salary growth to increased numbers of placements in agencies outside of library environments, and an exciting array of descriptors available to students seeking work inside the LIS field and elsewhere. This year more than 2100 LIS graduates responded to LJ’s annual Placements & Salaries survey, representing 34.7% of the 2011 graduating class from the 41 participating programs.

Survey Methods Make Sure Your School Gets Counted

This article was published in Library Journal. Subscribe today and save up to 35% off the regular subscription rate.

Stephanie L. Maatta About Stephanie L. Maatta

Stephanie Maatta, Ph.D. (, is an Assistant Professor at Wayne State University School of Library Information Science, Detroit

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  1. steve van tuyl says:

    Stephanie, is there any way to get the data for response rate from graduates? Some of the placement stats here are quite disturbing, but I wonder how much of this is due to poor response rates. Thoughts?