April 19, 2018

Orange City Public Library Pressured to Label, Segregate LGBTQ Material

Update: The Orange City Public Library’s board decided on March 20 to group books by subject and subcategory rather than alphabetical order by an author’s name. The new categorization method will be implemented on a trial basis, with a few subjects to start, this summer. If patrons like the new system, explained board president Jared Weber, it will expand to the rest of the library. The board will vote next month on the request to revise library policy to require additional input on acquisitions.

Kiara Garrett | Movers & Shakers 2018 – Innovators

When a prospective date asked Kiara Garrett to recommend a book, she suggested Junot Díaz’s This Is How You Lose Her. He mistakenly thought the collection offered relationship advice. Garrett told him, “If you liked Jay-Z’s album 4:44, then you would like this book.”

Ideas for Building a Better Relationship with Your Campus Bookstore | From the Bell Tower

As more academic librarians seek to engage with open education resources (OER) and textbook affordability initiatives, there are naturally concerns about the impact on the campus bookstore. Start by considering how to build a better relationship.

Kristin Treviño | Movers & Shakers 2018 – Community Builders

Kristin Treviño, youth and digital services librarian at the South Irving Library, part of Texas’s Irving Public Library, used her knowledge of the impact that connecting young readers with the right book can have to plan an immensely popular event, the North Texas Teen Book Festival.

Robin Bradford | Movers & Shakers 2018 – Advocates

Whether she is tweeting her latest collection find, speaking to the New York Times about diversity in romance, presenting at professional conferences, or pushing libraries to purchase self-published (indie) books, collection development librarian Robin Bradford constantly campaigns for readers’ needs.

Roberta Koscielski | Movers & Shakers 2018 – Advocates

Roberta Koscielski has a long history with the Peoria Public Library (PPL)—and with Common Place Family Learning Center, a community education nonprofit on Peoria’s south side, where she trained as an adult literacy tutor and eventually joined the board. That early connection set the tone for her entire 34-year library career.

Elizabeth Strout Wins 14th Annual Story Prize

The 14th annual Story Prize, given to the top short story collection published in 2017, went to Elizabeth Strout for Anything Is Possible. Strout, who won the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for her collection Olive Kitteridge, will take home $20,000 and an engraved silver bowl.

What’s Hot Now? | Materials Survey 2018

What’s hot, what’s not, and how much does it cost? That’s what LJ first asked two decades ago when it launched its annual book-buying survey of U.S. public libraries. With today’s media mostly on the horizon, the survey initially dwelled on print, and library purchasing power was the main thrust. Now the survey takes in ever-shifting funding and borrowing data for an ever-growing range of materials, with a greater focus on what circulates.

Meet the “Buzz Whisperer”: Book Pulse Keeps You Up On What’s Trending | Editorial

The book world is always buzzing. But the buzz can be hard to harness for daily, timely application in our libraries. I’m pleased to share that librarians now have a new tool to put to work. Meet LJ’s Book Pulse, launched in October and powered by the deeply experienced and highly creative readers’ advisory (RA) expert Neal Wyatt.