May 23, 2018

MIT Libraries Tackles Grand Challenges | Peer to Peer Review

During the week of March 19–23 MIT Libraries convened experts from across disciplines and domains to identify and address grand challenges in the scholarly communication and information science landscape.

Teaching the Teachers: Primary Sources Immersion Program | Peer to Peer Review

The recent approval of the Society of American Archivists/Association of College and Research Libraries’ Rare Books and Manuscripts Section Joint Task Force on the Development of Guidelines for Primary Source Literacy illustrates the professions’ move beyond show-and-tell style teaching.

LSU and Elsevier: A Tale of Two Contracts | Peer to Peer Review

In a May 2 statement, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) announced that Louisiana State University (LSU) filed a lawsuit against academic publishing company Elsevier for breach of contract on February 27. According to the complaint, Elsevier cut off the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine’s (SVM) access to content that was legally licensed by LSU Libraries. For many reasons, especially Elsevier’s often contentious relationship with libraries over the decades, this will be one of the more interesting cases to watch unfold.

Beyond Fake News | Peer to Peer Review

Over the course of the fall semester, I had the opportunity to visit a handful of classes to speak on news literacy. I began by posing the question, “Does the news media take sides?” Though a small sample, nearly 100 percent of students I polled distrusted the media. I found this wariness of the mainstream media echoed throughout classes I visited — on campuses ranging from rural Humphreys County to just a few miles outside downtown Nashville—as I quizzed students on their news habits.

Legacy Matters: How Academic Repositories Can Fulfill Emotional Requests | Peer to Peer Review

Many academic repositories contain a vast amount of material beyond the requisite theses and dissertations. Those that do ingest them often contain such documents dating back to the 1800s or, in some cases, earlier. That might not sound like something to get too excited about. But, do you know who does get enthusiastic about that? The web surfer who stumbles across something her beloved great-great-grandfather wrote in 1886, or his father presented at a conference in 1970, or a whole host of other legacy material that can be found in an institutional repository.

Shakespeare Celebration: A Town-Gown Collaboration | Peer to Peer Review

Kansas City Public Library, the lone site in the state of Missouri to host a copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio, worked with a local university on a for-credit course to prepare student docents.

The Difference between Copyright Infringement and Plagiarism—and Why It Matters | Peer to Peer Review

Reading a recent article in the Atlantic and the subsequent comments, I was struck again by how much confusion there is among the public about the difference between plagiarism and copyright infringement.

GSU e-Reserves Decision | Peer to Peer Review

The infamous Georgia State University (GSU) e-reserves case (Cambridge University Press v. Patton) emerged last month from its long winter slumber to give us yet another 200+ page decision which librarians, lawyers, and publishers have begun to parse and analyze. And, like me, they are probably asking themselves: What does this decision actually mean?

Promise and Peril of AI for Academic Librarians | From the Bell Tower

It is still early in the development of artificial intelligence but eventually it will change the work of librarians—or make it irrelevant. How likely is it that we will be replaced by bots in the future?

Library Robot Coming to Welsh University

At Aberystwyth University in the United Kingdom, users will soon have a novel means of consulting the catalog at the college’s Hugh Owen Library. Rather than typing their request, or asking a reference librarian, students can be led to the title they’re looking for by a robot with access to all of the library’s holdings.