May 25, 2018

Sports As a Model for Library Leadership Learning | Leading from the Library

Sports and librarianship rarely come up in the same conversation, but when it comes to learning about leadership there may be common ground between the two.

What’s Next for Design Thinking in Librarianship | From the Bell Tower

Librarians having been talking about design thinking for at least ten years. With growing interest surfacing in higher education and libraries, will we see broader adoption in academic libraries?

Ideas for Building a Better Relationship with Your Campus Bookstore | From the Bell Tower

As more academic librarians seek to engage with open education resources (OER) and textbook affordability initiatives, there are naturally concerns about the impact on the campus bookstore. Start by considering how to build a better relationship.

Jennifer A. Ferretti | Movers & Shakers 2018 – Community Builders

Jennifer Ferretti has been a digital librarian for more than ten years at various institutions. A fine arts graduate from Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA), she returned to MICA in 2015 to lead digital initiatives. “I never wanted to be a librarian,” says Ferretti, because “I didn’t know what librarians did. I never had a librarian I connected to and never met a Latinx librarian.” A supportive internship supervisor at the Smithsonian (2007–08) and a strong community on “librarian Twitter” changed that.

April M. Hathcock | Movers & Shakers 2018 – Advocates

How did April Hathcock go from corporate litigator to librarian? “I was working away on multimillion-dollar suits every night when I noticed the law librarians, who left at a decent hour, did much of the same research I did,” she says. “I realized I could do…the information wrangling I loved without [working] myself to death.” Now, as scholarly communication librarian at New York University (NYU), Hathcock still does legal work, helping with copyright or intellectual property research, library contracts, or access and rights issues. “But it’s combined with the values of librarianship,” she says.

Higher Ed’s Terrible, Horrible, No Good Year: Let’s Help Make 2018 Better | From the Bell Tower

American higher education came under attack in 2017 as the political, cultural, and social divisions in our society widened. It stood accused of forcing liberal politics on students, hampering free speech on campus, and fostering an environment of incivility in and beyond the classroom. Academic librarians could help lead our institutions to regain their status as our society’s bastion of free speech.

Textbook Affordability: What’s Happening in Your State | From the Bell Tower

The good news is that more academic librarians are leading textbook affordability and open educational resources initiatives at their institutions. What if we could do even more good work with statewide efforts? Fortunately, there are some good models to lead the way.

Faculty and Archives Partner on MIT and Slavery Project

One of the newest courses on offer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is “MIT and Slavery,” collaboratively taught by Steven Craig Wilder, Barton L. Weller Professor of History, and Nora Murphy, archivist for reference, outreach, and instruction. The undergraduate class will focus on researching MIT’s historical ties to slavery and the slave trade, as well as the role the slave economy played in other American engineering and science institutions.

Five Trends Changing Higher Education That Librarians Need to Watch | From the Bell Tower

Higher education has a reputation for staying the same. That’s never been more of a myth than right now. Some of the changes have little impact on academic librarians. Others require more of our attention.

Digital vs Print: Taking a Position as an Academic Librarian | From the Bell Tower

As collections transition to digital and print finds its way into remote storage sites, how does our profession respond to research that favors print over digital for reading comprehension, learning, and meeting student preferences?