May 25, 2018

What’s Next for Design Thinking in Librarianship | From the Bell Tower

Librarians having been talking about design thinking for at least ten years. With growing interest surfacing in higher education and libraries, will we see broader adoption in academic libraries?

Susan Hildreth: Bridging LIS and Practice | Learning in Practice

As the inaugural Distinguished Practitioner in Residence (Professor of Practice) at the University of Washington Information School (UW iSchool), Susan ­Hildreth contributes a wealth of experience to her role connecting academia with the public library field.

Five Trends Changing Higher Education That Librarians Need to Watch | From the Bell Tower

Higher education has a reputation for staying the same. That’s never been more of a myth than right now. Some of the changes have little impact on academic librarians. Others require more of our attention.

What Not to Do: Tips for New Library Leaders | Leading from the Library

A new role leading in any capacity, but particularly as a library director, can be stressful. New leaders usually get lots of tips on what to do. A good honeymoon period strategy can also benefit from a few what-not-to-do tips.

One of the Toughest Leadership Jobs: The College Presidency | Leading from the Library

An uptick in a number of college presidents leaving their positions early on, along with two new reports on the skills necessary to be an effective college leader, shed some light on what it takes to lead a complex organization.

Why Social Justice in the Library? | Outreach + Inreach

Libraries of all types are reevaluating the role they play in their community, questioning whether it is still good enough to provide equal access, or if it is time to pursue an active equitable access that focuses on empowering the less powerful and amplifying the voices of the unheard.

Exit Strategies | Careers

Library jobs change for many reasons: community needs shift, technology automates old tasks or enables new ones, new leadership sets new priorities, or economic setbacks spur pruning. The results for those already in the job can be a challenge—and sometimes, the best course is to exit and regroup.

Cultivating Curiosity in Libraries

Teachers and those who study learning have long known that curiosity is important to the learning process and better outcomes. But what causes it, how to encourage it, and even how to define it have proved the concept more complicated than it first appears. Now, recent studies suggest that the desire to know more may be quantifiable, which could provide librarians and other educators with new tools for leveraging curiosity to improve how people process and relate to information.

Jenna Hartel | LJ/ALISE Excellence in Teaching Award Winner 2016

On her website, Jenna Hartel talks of “a different character of LIS”—one rooted in positivity, curiosity, and proactivity. It’s what she calls “the bright side of information,” a focus on the upbeat aspect of library studies that has won Hartel, associate professor on the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto (U of T), a special spot in the hearts of her students and fellow faculty members—and the 2016 Library Journal/ALISE Excellence in Teaching Award, sponsored by ­Rowman & Littlefield.

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Vanessa Irvin Preaches the Art of Storytelling to Future Librarians

“We are all walking stories, so it’s vital that as librarians, we learn the art of listening to story…” says Irvin, an assistant professor in the library and information science program at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. “[We need to be] willing to share our own stories so that we best relate to patrons, communities, and stakeholders.”