February 16, 2018

Technology

FCC Kills Net Neutrality, Fight Likely to Move to Courts

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) today passed the “Restoring Internet Freedom Order” (RIFO), overturning the 2015 Open Internet Order, a regulatory framework established during the Obama administration that gave the FCC the power to enforce “net neutrality,” defining broadband Internet as a utility similar to electricity or water, and requiring Internet Service Providers (ISPs), such as Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T, to treat all data traffic on the Internet equally.

ITHAKA Next Wave Conference Focuses on Higher Ed Challenges

Speakers at ITHAKA’s The Next Wave conference, held at New York’s Roosevelt Hotel on November 29, made the case for work that colleges and universities must take on if they want to improve national educational attainment. The conference, “Innovating and Adapting to Address Today’s Higher Education Challenges,” looked at new approaches from a variety of angles, from administration to the classroom to research, with alignment between leadership and the library given particular attention.

SJSU-Led Team Explores Blockchain in Libraries

A group led by San Jose State University iSchool (SJSU) Director Sandra Hirsh and SJSU lecturer Susan Alman is exploring how the library field could use blockchain, the open source, secure distributed database system originally developed to validate and record Bitcoin cryptocurrency transactions. Funded with a recent $100,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), SJSU is planning an online Library 2.0 conference on the topic on June 7, 2018, and a Blockchain National Forum in mid-2018.

Library of Congress Encourages Public to Engage with Digital Resources via labs.loc.gov

The Library of Congress (LC) recently launched labs.loc.gov, a new online space that facilitates creative use of the Library’s digital collections.

Adam Matthew Enables Full-Text Search of Handwritten Manuscripts

Adam Matthew Digital last month announced the launch of Handwritten Text Recognition, an artificial intelligence technology that enables full-text searching of digitized, handwritten manuscript collections.

Virtually There | Product Spotlight

Public interest in virtual reality (VR) technology is on the rise. People can view VR apps on the latest smartphones using headsets as inexpensive as the $12.99 Google Cardboard. And high-end, PC-driven head-mounted displays are now available for $600 or less, with a growing number of realistic games or educational “field trip” applications available to transport users from their living rooms and classrooms into immersive environments.

Mainland Libraries Aid Maria Victims with Money, Mapathons

Update: ALA president-elect Loida García-Febo told LJ that disaster relief organizations and library groups like REFORMA (the National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking) are still assessing the damage. ALA has established contact with the University of Puerto Rico Library and the Puerto Rican chapter of REFORMA—the organization’s largest—she reported, and is just beginning to gauge their needs.

Google Directs Users to Library Ebooks from OverDrive

OverDrive is enabling Google to display library ebooks prominently in open web search results. Announced in a tweet last month by Google, and reported by media outlets including Slate, Fortune.com, and TheVerge, the new feature displays a “Borrow ebook” option highlighting the searched for title and linking to libraries within a user’s geolocated range.

Visualizing the Future | TechKnowledge

Academic libraries have always enabled access to books, monographs, journals, and other resources. With datasets emerging as a new type of content for collection and analysis, many libraries are not only helping students and faculty acquire datasets, and hosting those they create, but debuting innovative services that assist graduate students and faculty with expressing their findings effectively through data visualization. These, in turn, make those libraries increasingly relevant to departments campuswide.

Library Freedom Institute to Launch Train-the-Trainers Course on Internet Privacy, Security

This fall New York University (NYU), in partnership with the Library Freedom Project, will be seeking applicants for the Library Freedom Institute (LFI), a new program that will train 40 geographically dispersed librarians as “Privacy Advocates.”